Gregory VII


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Gregory VII

, Saint Originally Hil·de·brand  (hĭl′də-brănd′) 1020?-1085.
Pope (1073-1085) who sought to establish the supremacy of the pope within the Church and the authority of the Church over the state.

Gregory VII

n
(Biography) Saint, monastic name Hildebrand. ?1020-–85, pope (1073–85), who did much to reform abuses in the Church. His assertion of papal supremacy and his prohibition (1075) of lay investiture was opposed by the Holy Roman Emperor Henry IV, whom he excommunicated (1076). He was driven into exile when Henry captured Rome (1084). Feast day: May 25
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Noun1.Gregory VII - the Italian pope who fought to establish the supremacy of the pope over the Roman Catholic Church and the supremacy of the church over the state (1020-1085)
References in classic literature ?
Thus, the Roman abbey, the philosophers' church, the Gothic art, Saxon art, the heavy, round pillar, which recalls Gregory VII., the hermetic symbolism, with which Nicolas Flamel played the prelude to Luther, papal unity, schism, Saint-Germain des Prés, Saint-Jacques de la Boucherie,--all are mingled, combined, amalgamated in Notre-Dame.
Ladislaus - with the consent of Pope Gregory VII - canonised King Stephen and his son Prince Emeric along with Bishop Gellert in the Szekesfehervar Basilica.
Roman Catholics honor Saturday, May 25, the life and works of Saint Gregory VII, who is considered as one of the greatest Roman Pontiffs of all time.
In particular, they challenge the widely held idea that popes from Leo IX to Paschal II, with Gregory VII as a central figure, followed a long-term strategy of centralized, papal reform and that canon law played an important role in this strategy.
In the 11th century, Saint Gregory VII issued a decree requiring all priests to be celibate and asked his bishops to enforce it.
Thus, pace Kellogg, the historic document associated with Pope Gregory VII and known as the Dictatus papae [1075], though it does make much of the papal power of jurisdiction, says nothing about "papal infallibility" as such.
He claimed there were 11 married Popes until 1123 when Gregory VII introduced the rule.
The section on the truth of the judge opens with Florian Mazel addressing Gregory VII's opposition of truth to custom in his attack on the ecclesiastical practices of his time.
Tristan's unusual talents become useful to the Benedictines as well as to Rome, and the boy soon finds himself pulled into the visceral power struggle between Pope Gregory VII and Emperor Henrich IV as they mercilessly wage spiritual, political and military war upon each other to claim supremacy over the continent of Europe.
As ruler of the Empire it was Henry IV's divine right to ordain bishops and other clergymen, an authority that the new pope Gregory VII, a...
Nadia Togni, in "Italian Giant Bibles: The Circulation and Use of the Book at the Time of the Ecclesiastical Reform in the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries," argues that such Bibles (whose characteristic features she lists, 60) were produced in and sent from Rome to religious institutions which accepted the program of ecclesiastical reform promoted by Pope Gregory VII (1073 to 1085).
The Sicilian Guiscards' treatment of Pope Gregory VII and the French king Philip IV's brutalizing of Pope Boniface VIII come to mind.