Gregory of Nazianzus


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Related to Gregory of Nazianzus: Gregory of Nyssa, John Chrysostom, St. Gregory Nazianzen

Gregory of Nazianzus

(ˌnæzɪˈænzəs)
n
(Biography) Saint. ?329–89 ad, Cappadocian theologian: bishop of Caesarea (370–79). Feast days: Jan 2, 25, and 30
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Basil the Great, Gregory of Nyssa and Gregory of Nazianzus became renowned for their unequalled literary and pastoral work.
In the first section, Levering discusses the patristic writers (for example, Tertullian, Gregory of Nazianzus Augustine, and John of Damascus) and medieval commentators (for example, Anselm, Thomas Aquinas, and William of Ockham) on natural theology.
Among the topics are the use and function of illustrated books in Byzantine society, the Alexander Romance, the Vatican Book of Kings, the homilies of Gregory of Nazianzus, and the Christian Topography of Kosmas Indikopleustes.
The biblical and patristic notion of the sensible pointing to the intelligible was similarly evoked by Gregory of Nazianzus: "Through what is accessible and known, God attracts us; while through what is inaccessible and unknown, God is marvelled by us and desired still more ardently." (24) According to Augustine of Hippo, God creates the visible world through invisible seminal reasons (rationales seminales), a notion that is partly derived from the Stoic concept of rational seeds, or spermatikoi logoi.
in classics and patris-tics (with a thesis on the literary and philosophical thought of Cappadocian church father Gregory of Nazianzus).
Christ in the Life and Teaching of Gregory of Nazianzus. By Andrew Hofer, O.P.
In their attempt to expose and explain the mystery of faith in a God that is trinitarian and is defined in his very existence as love, the early church Fathers, in particular St Gregory of Nazianzus (2) and St John of Damascus, (3) insisted on the fact that God is not static but dynamic.
On the ninth day, Gregory of Nazianzus, who was the Archbishop of Constantinople during the fourth century, is honoured.
Topics include religious education in classical Greece, learning about the Etruscan religion in ancient Rome, the Gospel of Luke and Acts of the Apostles as precursor of the conjunction of biblical faith and Hellenistic education, religious education in late antique paganism, Basil of Caesarea and Gregory of Nazianzus on poetry in Christian education, primary and secondary religious education in Byzantium, and religious education and Bernard of Clairvaux.
This she does via the study of church fathers John of Damascus, Gregory of Nyssa, Athanasius, Gregory of Nazianzus, and St.
Gregory of Nazianzus, etc., and, indeed, to their pagan counterparts, men like the intellectually-gifted Emperor Julian referred to above, Julian had, in fact, sat side-by-side with Basil and Gregory in the schoolrooms of late fourth century Athens.