grice

(redirected from Gricean)

grice

(ˈɡraɪs)
vb
(Trainspotting) (intr) (of a railway enthusiast) to collect objects or visit places connected with trains and railways
n
(Trainspotting) an object collected or place visited by a railway enthusiast
[C20: origin obscure]
ˈgricer n
ˈgricing n
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References in periodicals archive ?
Some recent defenses of semiotic objections fall prey to the Gricean dilemma.
However, in spite of the importance of this theory, there have been few studies on the teachability of Gricean pragmatics (Bromberek-Dyzman & Ewert, 2010; Keenan, 1976; Murray, 2010, 2011) and the discrepant results obtained in these studies evidence the need for further research.
Jamet, "The Gricean Maxims of Quantity and of Relation in the Turing Test," in Proceedings of the 2018 11th International Conference on Human System Interaction (HSI), pp.
The extension of the meaning of going to from temporality to goal or intention can be interpreted in the light of this insight (Bybee 2015: 134), as can the development of since from temporal to causal (Bybee 2015: 204), though, admittedly, Alba-Juez and Mackenzie (244) do pay some attention to the connection between Gricean pragmatics and frequently observed types of semantic change (as noted in Traugott 2007: 540).
First because the theoretical framework provided by pragmalinguistics and Gricean conversational maxims in general and by the four-dimension model of implicitness in particular seems to be an appropriate grid of analysis for this "delving into traumas" type of discourse and can open a line of interdisciplinary research.
2011) (noting that "[p]hilosophy of language and Gricean theory
When asked to give an example of a clear case where philosophy has made indisputable progress, one of the few candidates that comes to mind is something like a broadly construed Gricean theory of conversational implicatures: something along the lines of Grice's theory has to be right, that is any theory that essentially involves inferential processes, Relevance Theory included.
Conceptual metaphor and communication: An Austinian and Gricean analysis of Brian Clark's Whose life is it anyway?
In particular, courts recognize many of the same sorts of Gricean implicatures as do interlocutors in ordinary conversation.
Computational Interpretations of the Gricean Maxims in the Generation of Referring Expressions.