maitake

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mai·ta·ke

 (mī-tä′kē, -kĕ)
n.
An edible polypore mushroom (Grifola frondosa) native to Japan and North America that produces large clusters of overlapping gray or brown fan-shaped caps, grows at the base of trees or in cultivation, and is prized in Japanese cuisine and used as a dietary supplement. Also called hen of the woods.

[Japanese, dancing mushroom (from the resemblance of the layered, frondlike caps to the long fluttering sleeves of traditional Japanese dancers) : mai-, stem of mau, to dance (from Old Japanese mahu) + take, mushroom (from Old Japanese).]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Grifola grows in clusters at the base of trees, particularly oaks.
Lentinus edodes, and Grifola frondosa through submerged cultures have been reported to produce EPS.
The oral administration of extracts derived from [beta]-glucans of the medicinal mushroom Grifola frondosa (Maitake) has been shown to stimulate haematopoiesis and immune cells recovery post-paclitaxel treatment in animal models [25].
Biological activities of the polysaccharides produced from submerged culture of the edible Basidiomycete Grifola frondosa.
Kikuchi, Structures of New Ceramides from the Fruit Bodies of Grifola frondosa, Chem.
Nair, "Cyclooxygenase inhibitory and antioxidant compounds from the mycelia of the edible mushroom Grifola frondosa" Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol.
Growth, fruiting and lignocellulolytic enzyme production by the edible mushroom Grifola frondosa (maitake).
8:30 EXTRACTS FROM GANODERMA LUCIDUM, TRAMETES VERSICOLOR, GRIFOLA FRONDOSA, AND LENTINULA EDODES DECREASE XRE-MEDIATED TRANSCRIPTION INDUCED BY B [A] P**, Matthew D.
Beta-glucans, differing in molecular weight, have been isolated from many diverse species like Rhynchelytrum repens, Lentinus edodes, Grifola frondosa, Tremella mesenterica, Tremella aurantia, Zea mays, Agaricus blazei (mushroom), Phellinus buammi, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) (Rahar et al.
Acalypha wilkesiana, Acanthopanax gracilistylus, Allium sativum, Ananus comosus, Cissampelos sympodialis, Coriolus versicolor, Curcuma longa, Echinacea purpurea, Grifola frondosa, Harpagophytum procumbens, Panax ginseng, Polygala tenuifolia, Poria cocos, Silybum marianum, Smilax glabra, Tinospora cordifolia, Uncaria tomentosa, and Withania somnifera demonstrate modulation of multiple cytokines.