negligence

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Related to Gross negligence: ordinary negligence

neg·li·gence

 (nĕg′lĭ-jəns)
n.
1. The state or quality of being negligent.
2. A negligent act or a failure to act.
3. Law
a. Failure to use the degree of care appropriate to the circumstances, resulting in an unintended injury to another.
b. An act or omission showing such lack of care.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

negligence

(ˈnɛɡlɪdʒəns)
n
1. the state or quality of being negligent
2. a negligent act
3. (Law) law a civil wrong whereby a person or party is in breach of a legal duty of care to another which results in loss or injury to the claimant
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

neg•li•gence

(ˈnɛg lɪ dʒəns)

n.
1. the quality, fact, or result of being negligent; neglect.
2. an instance of being negligent.
3. Law. the failure to exercise a reasonable degree of care, esp. for the protection of other persons.
[1300–50; Middle English, variant of necligence < Latin necligentia. See negligent, -ence]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.negligence - failure to act with the prudence that a reasonable person would exercise under the same circumstances
nonaccomplishment, nonachievement - an act that does not achieve its intended goal
dereliction - willful negligence
comparative negligence - (law) negligence allocated between the plaintiff and the defendant with a corresponding reduction in damages paid to the plaintiff
concurrent negligence - (law) negligence of two of more persons acting independently; the plaintiff may sue both together or separately
contributory negligence - (law) behavior by the plaintiff that contributes to the harm resulting from the defendant's negligence; "in common law any degree of contributory negligence would bar the plaintiff from collecting damages"
criminal negligence, culpable negligence - (law) recklessly acting without reasonable caution and putting another person at risk of injury or death (or failing to do something with the same consequences)
neglect of duty - (law) breach of a duty
dodging, escape, evasion - nonperformance of something distasteful (as by deceit or trickery) that you are supposed to do; "his evasion of his clear duty was reprehensible"; "that escape from the consequences is possible but unattractive"
2.negligence - the trait of neglecting responsibilities and lacking concern
carelessness, sloppiness - the quality of not being careful or taking pains
dereliction, willful neglect, delinquency - a tendency to be negligent and uncaring; "he inherited his delinquency from his father"; "his derelictions were not really intended as crimes"; "his adolescent protest consisted of willful neglect of all his responsibilities"
laxness, remissness, laxity, slackness - the quality of being lax and neglectful
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

negligence

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

negligence

noun
The state or quality of being negligent:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
إهْمال، قِلَّة إهْتِمام
nedbalost
uagtsomhed
huolimattomuus
kæruleysi
nevērībanolaidība
malomarnost
dikkatsizlikihmalkârlık

negligence

[ˈneglɪdʒəns] N
1. (= carelessness) → negligencia f
through negligencepor negligencia
2. (Jur) → negligencia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

negligence

[ˈnɛglɪdʒəns] nnégligence f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

negligence

n (= carelessness)Nachlässigkeit f; (causing danger, Jur) → Fahrlässigkeit f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

negligence

[ˈnɛglɪdʒns] nnegligenza
through negligence → per negligenza
criminal negligence (Law) → reato d'omissione
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

negligence

(ˈneglidʒəns) noun
carelessness. The accident was caused by the driver's negligence.
ˈnegligent adjective
ˈnegligently adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

neg·li·gence

n. negligencia, descuido.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

negligence

n negligencia
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
I came into a kind of league with these two by the help of my governess, and they carried me out into three or four adventures, where I rather saw them commit some coarse and unhandy robberies, in which nothing but a great stock of impudence on their side, and gross negligence on the people's side who were robbed, could have made them successful.
In March this year Liz Reid, reviewing lawyer, CPS special crime division, said: ''I considered whether there was sufficient evidence to prosecute either the co-pilot or the Army officer who had placed Private Sean Tait on the flight that day, for the offence of manslaughter by way of gross negligence of any or all of the victims.
The Act was brought into force against the backdrop of a number of high profile failed prosecutions of companies, particularly those relating to public disasters, and in order to remedy the perceived failings of the common law offence of gross negligence manslaughter when applied to companies.
Releases of liability for future gross negligence violate public policy and are unenforceable, the California Supreme Court held in a wrongful death suit against the city of Santa Barbara for a developmentally disabled teen's drowning in a municipal swimming pool.
Prison officers Daniel Daymond, Paul Smith and Samantha Prime all deny charges of manslaughter by gross negligence in connection with Bailey's death.
Challenges to the BJR involve lack of good faith, lack of a rational business purpose and gross negligence in failing to supervise or be informed.
The sister of a detainee, who died of a brain tumor while in pretrial custody in a county facility, brought a wrongful death action under [section] 1983 alleging deliberate indifference to the detainee's medical needs and gross negligence. The district court granted summary judgment for the defendants and the sister appealed.
A jury awarded the man's family $42.5 million in damages due to the company's gross negligence in permitting the explosion.
16400 defines a breach of trust as a violation of any fiduciary duty and can be separated into three types: ordinary negligence, gross negligence (recklessness) and intentional (willful) breach of trust.
The evidence submitted in opposition to the plaintiffs motion for summary judgment showed that there was at most, negligence and perhaps gross negligence on the part of the nursing staff.
b.) Manslaughter by negligence: the killing of another person through gross negligence. Traffic fatalities are excluded.
Caps noneconomic damages at $350,000 and allows the cap to be waived if the patient can prove there was gross negligence.