Grosseteste


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Grosseteste

(ˈɡrəʊsˌtɛst)
n
(Biography) Robert. ?1175–1253, English prelate and scholar; bishop of Lincoln (1235–53). He attacked ecclesiastical abuses and wrote commentaries on Aristotle and treatises on theology, philosophy, and science
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Researchers in autism and other impediments to primary and secondary education, most of them associated with Bishop Grosseteste University, present material for sessions on autism for teacher trainees, for working teacher in professional development, or for self-study.
Students can gain more information on the Academy careers pages online at https://www.eastleake-ac.org.uk/curriculum/careersand-guidance/ Training providers (apprenticeships) present were Access Training, ASK (Apprenticeships) and Prostart while the Universities and such like were Bishop Grosseteste (Uni), DANCOP, De Montford (Uni), Leicester (Uni), Lincoln (Uni), Loughborough (Uni), Nottingham (Uni), Brooksby Melton Collage , Confetti StudiosConfetti Institute of Creative Technologies, ELASIXTH Form, Leicester College, Loughborough College, MADD and Nottingham College.
Grosseteste's Latin Version of Aristotle's Account of Natural Justice, JOSE A.
And she has played a key role in securing a three-year contact with the University of Birmingham, won a year-long contract for the huge charity Breast Cancer Now and won another tender for Bishop Grosseteste University.
Prognosticators like the 13th century Robert Grosseteste and 12th century Joachim de Fiore sought to understand the divine plan and write it down.
Indeed, Bishop Robert Grosseteste's popular and often-translated Stans puer ad mensam, originally written in the thirteenth-century, advises his reader:
Her argument depends on various medieval sources, including Augustine's three levels of vision, Peter of Limoges' sense of an individual's active will in seeing, and Robert Grosseteste's theories of light; and a useful discussion of intromission and extramission ends in a draw, whereby Young agrees with the work of Suzannah Biemoff on medieval vision theory that both mechanisms are considered to be operating.
He receives a 24 page stretch (and various other references), in a surprising contrast to Robert Grosseteste (five pages), Albert the Great (one paragraph) and Thomas Aquinas (a page and a half).