groundhog

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ground·hog

also ground hog  (ground′hôg′, -hŏg′)
n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

groundhog

(ˈɡraʊndˌhɒɡ)
n
(Animals) another name for woodchuck
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

wood•chuck

(ˈwʊdˌtʃʌk)

n.
a stocky North American burrowing rodent, Marmota monax, that hibernates in the winter. Also called groundhog.
[1665–75, Amer.; presumably a reshaping by folk etym. of a word in a Southern New England Algonquian language]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.groundhog - reddish brown North American marmotgroundhog - reddish brown North American marmot
marmot - stocky coarse-furred burrowing rodent with a short bushy tail found throughout the northern hemisphere; hibernates in winter
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

groundhog

[ˈgraʊndhɒg] N (US) → marmota f de América
GROUNDHOG DAY
Groundhog Day, que literalmente significa el día de la marmota, es una simpática tradición estadounidense, según la cual se puede predecir la duración del invierno por la observación del comportamiento de este animal. La marmota, en inglés groundhog, también conocida como ground squirrel o woodchuck, supuestamente despierta de su hibernación y abandona su madriguera el 2 de febrero (Groundhog Day). Si hace sol y la marmota ve su propia sombra, el animal se asusta y vuelve a su madriguera para seguir hibernando durante otras seis semanas, lo cual indica que habrá seis semanas más de invierno. El acontecimiento tiene tal importancia que es televisado a todo el país desde la madriguera más famosa de Punxsutawney, en Pensilvania.
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

groundhog

[ˈgraʊndhɒg] n (= woodchuck) → marmotte f commune
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
I've got a 10" .22 magnum that has accounted for a bunch of squirrels, coon and groundhogs; a 14" .222--but alas, few groundhogs anymore--a 10" .30 Herrett, a 14" .35 Remington and the aforementioned 10" .45/.410 that has also accounted for its share of bushytails.
Karen Baker, executive director of the Carroll County Humane Society, said she was surprised by how the animal acted and called its interaction with the officer "unusual." Groundhogs typically don't confront humans unless they are sick or injured, she explained.
Kim Miller, the animal wrangler who helped train 20 groundhogs for the 1993 film, was also there to explain that star Bill Murray was bitten during the scene where he holds the rodent at the wheel.
I have and have used a Havahart box trap to decrease the population of raccoons, groundhogs, and others that plague my garden each year.
Groundhogs' strong teeth are perfectly equipped for gnawing.
Scattered around the town of Punxsutawney, Pa., giant fiberglass groundhogs stand guard on street corners and sidewalks.
THE Groundhogs were based in the Richmond area of London and formed in 1962 by BT post office engineer Tony McPhee.
There being no groundhogs in the Willamette Valley, the nutria will have to do.
Meet the groundhog, also known as woodchuck and whistlepig This large, buck-toothed member of the squirrel family is a challenging target that will test even the most seasoned rifleman's skills.
On June 29, 2000, that magazine published this sentence: "At worst, [Rebecca West] had a mind that was closed and cold, like a small town lawyer's, prizing facts but estranged from imaginative truth." And on December 20, 2001, it published this: "The Gridiron dinner, as the affair is known, drags on for about five hours, enlivened mainly by the speeches of the politicians, whose ghostwriters in recent years have consistently outdone the journalists in the sharpness and grace of their wit (leaving journalists from the provinces with a strong impulse to follow the groundhogs back into their holes)."