Guardmember

Guard·mem·ber

 (gärd′mĕm′bər)
n.
A member of the National Guard.
References in periodicals archive ?
Every Guardmember learns occupational skills, many of which are directly transferable to the civilian workforce.
Results are used to help determine a Guardmember's occupation by matching vocational aptitudes, interests, and preferences with available openings.
However, its citizen soldiers and airmen, called Guardmembers, may serve in both federal and state capacities.
Today's guardmember, the 21st century minuteman, must be available to deploy at a moment's notice to defend America at home or abroad.
Within 72 hours of President Bush's request to the Governors, guardmembers were assisting civil authorities in protecting U.S.
Air guardmembers have executed CONUS runway alert missions since the 1950s, and Army guardmembers manned Nike missile sites in the 1960s and 1970s, all while serving in a state status.
* employed 2,383 people full-time, as well as 6,897 traditional guardmembers, in 2015
Additionally, many servicemembers are National Guardmembers and Reservists, who are not eligible for care within these military and veterans healthcare systems and will have to return to their civilian healthcare providers.
"In exchange for their cooperation" Dutko indicates, "employers of Guardmembers and reservists get quite a lot in return.
Yet in the current conflicts, Guardmembers and Reservists are being used in a fashion far different than the norm.
For many of the Guardmembers and Reservists, just as with their active-duty counterparts, the extended stays and multiple deployments have produced deeper stress both in the field and on their return home.
The people at the nonprofit Pennsylvania Disabled Veterans Rehabilitation/Vocational Retraining Project (PDVR/VRP) in Johnstown, Pennsylvania are executing a plan to address the unique needs of returning Guardmembers and Reservists.