Guevarism

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Guevarism

1. the political doctrines, policies, and revolutionary program of Ernesto “Che” Guevara (1928-1967), Cuban communist revolutionary.
2. adherence to or belief in Guevarism. — Guevarist, n., adj.
See also: Communism
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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The populist anticommunism of Belaunde targeted instead local versions of a now diversified communism, including the Trotskyist Hugo Blanco and his peasant movement in Cuzco, the Castroite or Guevarist insurrectionary groups (MIR, ELN) and the Maoist groups (Bandera Roja, Patria Roja).
If this were a Latin American country it would be a peasant or a Guevarist uprising.
The MIR, a Guevarist vanguard since its split from the Socialist
"Radical Guevarist ideological campaigns that target the private sector have often been carried out as ends in themselves, regardless of their impact on the economy," he said.
On the tenth anniversary of 1968, Regis Debray--a Guevarist radical in his youth, now an iconoclastic left-nationalist--complained that the rebels of 1968 had turned out to be as deluded about their real destination as Christopher Columbus, when he famously mistook the Americas for the Indies.
The Guevarist belief that armed struggles centred in foco of liberation could spark the mass sympathy of the oppressed and accelerate the development of revolutionary conditions had a particular resonance in Quebec.(122) For those who identified Quebec with the Third World, the Tricontinental Congress held in Havana in January 1966 sounded the tocsin of revolutionary activism worldwide.(123) This was not a paradigm peculiar to the FLQ's La Cognee nor to Quebec: it was the common property of the fourth formation.
In the late 1960s and early 1970s, many put their faith in Maoist, Castroist, Ho Chi Minhist, Guevarist, Algerian-style populist-peasant guerrilla revolution as the key to social, cultural and political transformation.
The original core of the Zapatista National Liberation Army (EZLN) was Guevarist. Of course, the evolution of the movement has taken it far from its beginnings, but the uprising of January 1994 and the very spirit of the EZLN retain elements of this heritage: the importance of armed struggle, the organic link between the armed forces and the peasantry, the rifle as a material expression of an exploited people's distrust of their oppressors, the readiness to risk one's life for the emancipation of one's brothers.
Oscar begins ticking off the "Guevarist" guerrilla groups that began to appear in Argentina as early as 1961.
Embracing a kind of Guevarist "foco" theory of collective action, Kuran proposes that cascading patterns of transformation--from collective apathy toward acquiescence in, or support for, an authority structure, to collective defiance and explicit renunciation of its claims--are traceable to the catalytic effect of actions by individuals with low thresholds for tolerating psychic dissonance when many other individuals are near their thresholds.
Even in the time of Guevarist guerrilla fighters of the 1960s and 1970s (still going on today in Peru), the United States never seemed to be unduly worried.