guinea worm

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guinea worm

n.
A nematode worm (Dracunculus medinensis) that is a parasite of humans in tropical Africa and formerly in Asia. Larvae are transmitted to humans when infected copepods are ingested in drinking water. The larvae develop in the body, and painful lesions occur when the mature female worms emerge gradually from the skin, usually of the lower legs.

[After the Guinea coast of Africa.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Guinea worm

n
(Animals) a parasitic nematode worm, Dracunculus medinensis, that lives beneath the skin in man and other vertebrates and is common in India and Africa
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

guin′ea

(or Guin′ea) worm`,


n.
a long, slender roundworm, Dracunculus medinensis, parasitic under the skin of humans and other mammals, common in parts of India and Africa.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.guinea worm - a painful and debilitating infestation contracted by drinking stagnant water contaminated with Guinea worm larvae that can mature inside a human's abdomen until the worm emerges through a painful blister in the person's skinGuinea worm - a painful and debilitating infestation contracted by drinking stagnant water contaminated with Guinea worm larvae that can mature inside a human's abdomen until the worm emerges through a painful blister in the person's skin
infestation - the state of being invaded or overrun by parasites
2.guinea worm - parasitic roundworm of India and Africa that lives in the abdomen or beneath the skin of humans and other vertebratesGuinea worm - parasitic roundworm of India and Africa that lives in the abdomen or beneath the skin of humans and other vertebrates
nematode, nematode worm, roundworm - unsegmented worms with elongated rounded body pointed at both ends; mostly free-living but some are parasitic
Dracunculus, genus Dracunculus - type genus of the family Dracunculidae
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Population genetic analysis of Chadian Guinea worms reveals that human and non-human hosts share common parasite populations.
The larvae mature into large adult Guinea worms and leave the body after about a year, causing debilitating ulcers.
The full multiscale model presented in this paper is based on monitoring the dynamics of ten populations at any time t, which are susceptible humans [S.sub.H](t) and infected humans [I.sub.H](t) in the behavioural human environment; infected copepods [I.sub.C] in the human biological environment; mature Guinea worms [W.sub.M](t) and fertilized female Guinea worms [W.sub.F](t) in the biological human environment (within-host parasite dynamics); Guinea worm eggs [E.sub.W](t) and Guinea worm larvae [L.sub.W](t) in the physical water environment; susceptible copepods [S.sub.E](t) and infected copepods [I.sub.E](t) in the physical water environment; and gastric juice [G.sub.J](t) in the human biological environment.
Species identification of North American guinea worms (Nematoda: Dracunculus) with DNA barcoding.
She was assigned to health education, especially to curb infections of Guinea worms. For Parker, her Peace Corps experience set the foundation for a career in public health.
'Not so long ago, both the villagers and their camels had to drink water drawn from wells that were infested with Guinea worms,' says agronomist Bartolome Marti Parellada, who supervised the setting up of the village's new market garden as well as a water-purification project.
In general, Guinea worms in mammals are regarded as D.
RFK judge Tom Kennedy of Washington Post/Newsweek Interactive said the Times journalists combined "statistical research and interviews with public health experts, local volunteers, aid donors, scientists, and community leaders with directly-observed heartbreaking anecdotes about the lives of those impacted by diseases such as polio, measles, guinea worms, lymphatic filariasis, trachoma, as well as iodine deficiencies."
"Guinea worms do not crawl out on their own," says Ruiz-Tiben.
It is believed, for example, that the biblical "fiery serpents" that tormented ancient Hebrews by the Red Sea were probably what we now call guinea worms. As recently as 1991, this parasitic scourge was the focus of a United Nations World Health Assembly resolution for eradication worldwide by the turn of the century.
Because certain patients have multiple Guinea worms emerge, more laboratory-confirmed specimens than cases might be reported in any given period.