Guiscard


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Guis·card

 (gē-skär′), Robert

Guiscard

(French ɡiskar)
n
(Biography) Robert (rɔbɛr). ?1015–85, Norman conqueror in S Italy
References in classic literature ?
Further back are knights from Quercy, Limousin, Saintonge, Poitou, and Aquitaine, with the valiant Sir Guiscard d'Angle.
Gregory responded by allying himself with the ferocious Norman ruler of Naples, Robert Guiscard, who raised the siege, sacked the city, and made a prisoner of Gregory, who promptly died.
The next section gives details on eight Norman commanders, from 1085 through 1111: Robert Guiscard, William the Conqueror, Richard I, Roger I, William II Rufus, Robert II Curthose, Henry I, and Bohemond, Prince of Antioch.
With our new designfabrik we are now in an even better position to translate the creative ideas of the designers into feasible material concepts," explained Guiscard Gluck, vice president, New Markets and Products, BASF SE.
Among the families that came to prominence in the eleventh and twelfth centuries were the Drengots from near Rouen; the Grandmesnils from Calvados, who established themselves in Wales, Italy, Syria and Constantinople; and the Hautevilles (especially Robert Guiscard) from the Contentin, who left indelible marks on the Mezzogiorno and Sicily (Norwich; Gravett and Nicolle; Bartlett, The Making of Europe 28-29).
In 1063, a Pisan fleet attacked Arab-held Palermo to support the Norman adventurer Robert Guiscard, who, with his brother Roger, was retaking the island.
Taken in by a kind farmer, the transformed being, who calls himself Paolo, learns to cope with the moral complexity of being a young man in contemporary society, while Fey is left to cope with the loss of both her magic and the chance to become handfasted with the noble, chivalrous Guiscard.
If't be a fault to shew you how a story May be preseru'd longer in memory Then if one tong alone had told a tale Our expectation's crost, & we shall faile Of hauing courteous censure; yet ner'theless 5 All that haue cleare ey'd iudgements, will confess He merits more, that shewes acutely how Ghismonda did for Guiscard, (to keep the vow Which she'd brauely made,) then to heare this Absurdly told.
Arnaldi traces the events that led to the invasion of Byzantine Calabria and Arab and Berber Sicily, focusing on the military campaigns of Robert Guiscard and his younger brother Roger.