gunfight

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gun·fight

 (gŭn′fīt′)
n.
A duel or battle with firearms.

gun′fight′er n.

gunfight

(ˈɡʌnˌfaɪt)
n
(Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) chiefly US a fight between persons using firearms
ˈgunˌfighter n
ˈgunˌfighting n

gun•fight

(ˈgʌnˌfaɪt)

n.
a battle between two or more people or groups using guns.
[1650–60]
gun′fight`er, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gunfight - a fight involving shooting small arms with the intent to kill or frightengunfight - a fight involving shooting small arms with the intent to kill or frighten
fighting, combat, fight, scrap - the act of fighting; any contest or struggle; "a fight broke out at the hockey game"; "there was fighting in the streets"; "the unhappy couple got into a terrible scrap"
Translations

gunfight

[ˈgʌnfaɪt] Ntiroteo m

gunfight

[ˈgʌnfaɪt] néchange m de coups de feu

gunfight

[ˈgʌnˌfaɪt] nscontro a fuoco
References in classic literature ?
This elderly, round-bellied, and bald-headed gunfighter, too, had a wife and family.
The last man to wear a sheriff's badge has finally been driven out of Jackson Creek and Jake Pierce plans to take over the town, backed by a group of vicious gunfighters.
Cast of Characters Collect over 50 popular gunfighters for your master collection
Family intrigue, a courtship, a post-war career as a dentist, all set the stage for how John Henry Holliday was to eventually become one of the most famous western gunfighters of his day.
After that time most famous Old West personages were gunfighters.
Drawing on archival sources such as actual San Francisco newspaper interviews with Sawyer and the handwritten police depositions of the arrest of the Lightkeeper, bestselling author Robert Graysmith vividly portrays the gritty, corrupt, and violent world of Gold Rush-era San Francisco, overrun with gunfighters, hooligans, hordes of gold prospectors, crooked politicians, and vigilantes.
I have stacks of books in my home devoted to the gunfighters of the Old West, with some of the authors actually contradicting one another in regards to the people and circumstances of which they write.
The work details the struggle for law and order in Arizona from its earliest settlement until 1912 and follows the westward migration of gunfighters from Oklahoma, Texas, and elsewhere in the Southwest after the Civil War, with a focus on the development of southeastern Arizona, especially Tombstone; the Pleasant Valley War; the rise and fall of train robbers; the gunfight at the OK Corral; and the role of the Arizona Rangers in ending large-scale cattle rustling.
The beleaguered peasants living in a remote Mexican village seek to recruit seven American gunfighters - led by Chris (Yul Brynner) and Vin (Steve McQueen) - to protect them from marauding bandits.
Taking The Seven Samurai (1954) and transporting the action west, Yul Brynner and six gunfighters were hired to defend a town against bandits.
These are wonderfully written stories of range wars, posse pursuits, and gunfighters with a conscience.
I also think that parallels can be drawn with the 19th century "Wild West" we see in films on that period, but in these the onus is on the skill of gunfighters, as the six gun was the "equaliser" in that men of weak physique could gain a reputation by being willing to risk their lives in gun fights, e.