Gunn


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Gunn

(ɡʌn)
n
(Biography) Thom(son William). 1929–2004, British poet who lived in the USA. His works include Fighting Terms (1954), My Sad Captains (1961), Jack Straw's Castle (1976), The Man with the Night Sweats (1992), and Boss Cupid (2000)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
"Ben Gunn," he answered, and his voice sounded hoarse and awkward, like a rusty lock.
Well, you just put your trust in Ben Gunn--Ben Gunn's the man to do it.
"Aye, but you see," returned Ben Gunn, "I didn't mean giving me a gate to keep, and a suit of livery clothes, and such; that's not my mark, Jim.
'As for you, Benjamin Gunn,' says they, 'here's a musket,' they says, 'and a spade, and pick-axe.
(says you), and sometimes he would maybe think of his old mother, so be as she's alive (you'll say); but the most part of Gunn's time (this is what you'll say)--the most part of his time was took up with another matter.
"Then," he continued, "then you'll up, and you'll say this: Gunn is a good man (you'll say), and he puts a precious sight more confidence--a precious sight, mind that--in a gen'leman born than in these gen'leman of fortune, having been one hisself."
Gunn's Family Medicine, which told you all about what to do if a body was sick or dead.
On the one hand, there were ladies no less important than the two Miss Gunns, the wine merchant's daughters from Lytherly, dressed in the height of fashion, with the tightest skirts and the shortest waists, and gazed at by Miss Ladbrook (of the Old Pastures) with a shyness not unsustained by inward criticism.
Then Nancy was formally introduced to her aunt's visitors, the Miss Gunns, as being the daughters of a mother known to their mother, though now for the first time induced to make a journey into these parts; and these ladies were so taken by surprise at finding such a lovely face and figure in an out-of-the-way country place, that they began to feel some curiosity about the dress she would put on when she took off her joseph.
Three of the ladies quickly retired, but the Miss Gunns were quite content that Mrs.
I don't mind, do you?" Priscilla here turned to the Miss Gunns, rattling on in too much preoccupation with the delight of talking, to notice that her candour was not appreciated.
"Sister," said Nancy, when they were alone, "you've offended the Miss Gunns, I'm sure."