gymnasiarch


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gymnasiarch

(dʒɪmˈneɪzɪˌɑːk)
n
1. (Historical Terms) (in ancient Greece) an official who supervised athletic schools and contests
2. (Education) obsolete the governor or chief tutor of an academy or college
[C17: from Latin, from Greek gymnasiarchos, from gymnasion gymnasium + -archos ruling]
References in periodicals archive ?
His presence - and mode of dress - drew considerable attention and a report in the Penny Illustrated Paper mentioned: "A turbaned gentleman, attired in the garb of a Turk was supposed to represent the East at the Olympian Festival, but the fancifully-dressed one turned out to be the Gym - wait a minute, I''ll spell it directly - the Gymnasiarch of Liverpool, John Hulley, and whom no-one was more gorgeously apparelled.
For instance, that Chaereas is coming back from a gymnasium when he falls in love does not need to call forth Athenagoras' position as gymnasiarch (p.
This seems to be confirmed for the late fifth century by the story of Prodicus' expulsion by the gymnasiarch of the Lyceum for being a bad influence on the young (Pa.
31) It may be that the eventual addition of publicly appointed or elected gymnasiarchs and paidotribai, of which there is some evidence in the fourth century, (32) reflected not only further democratization of athletic training, but also a desire to remove it from the realm of private patronage and pederastic influence, which was increasingly marginalized by Athenian democratic discourse as a social practice only of the elite.
Side A is shown to have the following subjects: heading (1-22); designation of the subsequent text as the gymnasiarchal law (22); election of the gymnasiarch and assistants (22-24); oath of the gymnasiarch (24-34); assumption of office by the gymnasiarch (34-40) .
While presiding at the Athenian games organized to honor Ventidius's victories over the Parthians, Antony left at home his Roman paraphernalia ("his guard, his axes, and tokens of his empire") and dressed as a gymnasiarch, or judge of the games, "in a long gown and slippers after the Grecian fashion" (217).
The Penny Illustrated Paper said: "A turbaned gentleman, attired in the garb of a Turk, was supposed to represent the East at the Olympian Festival, but the fancifully-dressed one turned out to be the Gymnasiarch of Liverpool, John Hulley.