formic acid

(redirected from HCOOH)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to HCOOH: HBR

formic acid

n.
A colorless caustic fuming liquid, CH2O2, used in dyeing and finishing textiles and paper and in manufacturing fumigants, insecticides, and refrigerants.

[From its natural occurrence in ants.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

formic acid

n
(Elements & Compounds) a colourless corrosive liquid carboxylic acid found in some insects, esp ants, and many plants: used in dyeing textiles and the manufacture of insecticides and refrigerants. Formula: HCOOH. Systematic name: methanoic acid
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

for′mic ac′id


n.
a colorless, irritating, fuming liquid, CH2O2, orig. obtained from ants and now made synthetically, used in dyeing and tanning and as a counterirritant and astringent.
[1785–95]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

for·mic acid

(fôr′mĭk)
A colorless, caustic, fuming liquid, CH2O2, that occurs naturally as the poison of ants and stinging nettles. It is used in making textiles and paper and in insecticides.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.formic acid - a colorless pungent fuming vesicatory liquid acid HCOOH found naturally in ants and many plants or made catalytically from carbon monoxide and steam; used in finishing textiles and paper and in the manufacture of insecticides and fumigants
acid - any of various water-soluble compounds having a sour taste and capable of turning litmus red and reacting with a base to form a salt
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
metaanihappomuurahaishappo
蟻酸
maursyre
myrsyra
formik asit

formic acid

[ˌfɔːmɪkˈæsɪd] Nácido m fórmico
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

formic acid

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Formic acid (HCOOH) has been bought from Tianjin Hongyan Reagent Factory, China.
During the regeneration process, the formed HCOOH can be easily collected for further centralized disposal and/or reuse.
The column was a Nucleodur C18 ISIS, 250 x 4.6 mm, solvent A: [H.sub.2]O:C[H.sub.3]CN: HCOOH (950:50:1) (v/v/v), solvent B: C[H.sub.3]CN:HCOOH (1000:1) (v/v), gradient: up to 5 min 100% A, to 25 min 100% B, 30 min 100% B, 30.1 min 100% A.
Anode: HCOOH [right arrow] C[O.sub.2] + 2[H.sup.+] + 2[e.sup.-]
The authors suggested that the selectivity of products formation through the two-electron reduction of C[O.sub.2], CO, or HCOOH could be attributed to distinct protonation and reduction steps for the reactions mediated by cobalt or iron, respectively.
Fish Quinolones Homogenized fish (5 g) was extracted with 5% HCOOH in MeCN (10 mL) in the presence of MgS[O.sub.4], NaCl, NaOAc, and [Na.sub.2]HCiM*5[H.sub.2]O, followed by d-SPE using [C.sub.18] and MgS[O.sub.4].
In the negative ion mode MS1 spectrum, the most intense peak corresponded to the deprotonated molecular ion [[M - H].sup.-] or formate adduct [[M + HCOOH - H].sup.-].
bath components Concentration in (g/L) and parameters NiS[O.sub.4] x 7[H.sub.2]O 177 Ni[CL.sub.2] x 7[H.sub.2]O 32 CoS[O.sub.4]-7[H.sub.2]O 11 HCHO 25 HCOOH 23 [H.sub.3]B[O.sub.3] 30 Current density (mA/[cm.sup.2]) 30, 50, 80 Deposition time (min) 15, 20, 30 pH 2.5-3 Temperature 21 [+ or -] 1[degrees]C Table 3: EDX analysis of electrodeposited nanocrystalline Ni-Co layers.
Fragments m/z 199.0861 and 185.0705 were yielded via loss of HCOOH (-46.0060 Da) and C[H.sub.3]COOH (-60.0216 Da) from m/z 245.0921, respectively, indicating that F18 was a carboxylic acid.
Chromatographic separation was carried out at 25[degrees]C, on an Eclipse XDB-C18 column (4.6 x 150 mm, 5 [micro]m particle size; Agilent Technologies, USA) with a mobile phase consisting of water containing 0.1% HCOOH (solvent A) and acetonitrile containing 0.1% HCOOH (solvent B), using 5 [micro]L injections.