oscillation

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oscillation
Oscillation of a clock pendulum takes it from point a to point b and back to a. The dashed red line is the position of the pendulum at rest.

os·cil·la·tion

 (ŏs′ə-lā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The action of oscillating.
b. The state of being oscillated.
2. A single oscillatory cycle.

os′cil·la′tion·al adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

oscillation

(ˌɒsɪˈleɪʃən)
n
1. (General Physics) physics statistics
a. regular fluctuation in value, position, or state about a mean value, such as the variation in an alternating current or the regular swinging of a pendulum
b. a single cycle of such a fluctuation
2. the act or process of oscillating
oscillatory adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

os•cil•la•tion

(ˌɒs əˈleɪ ʃən)

n.
1. an act or instance of oscillating.
2.
a. a single swing in one direction of an oscillating body.
b. a single fluctuation between the maximum and minimum values of an oscillatory cycle.
[1650–60; < Latin]
os′cil•la•to`ry (-ləˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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oscillation
The time it takes the pendulum to swing from a to b and back to a is known as its period. The dashed red line from the central point represents the position of the pendulum at rest.

os·cil·la·tion

(ŏs′ə-lā′shən)
1. A steady, uninterrupted, backward and forward swinging about a central point. Compare vibration.
2. A single cycle of motion about a central position.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

oscillation

A repetitive vibration with a regular frequency.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oscillation - the process of oscillating between statesoscillation - the process of oscillating between states
libration - (astronomy) a real or apparent slow oscillation of a moon or satellite; "the libration of the moon"
natural action, natural process, action, activity - a process existing in or produced by nature (rather than by the intent of human beings); "the action of natural forces"; "volcanic activity"
2.oscillation - (physics) a regular periodic variation in value about a mean
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
ripple - (electronics) an oscillation of small amplitude imposed on top of a steady value
undulation, wave - (physics) a movement up and down or back and forth
transient - (physics) a short-lived oscillation in a system caused by a sudden change of voltage or current or load
beat - a single pulsation of an oscillation produced by adding two waves of different frequencies; has a frequency equal to the difference between the two oscillations
resonance - a vibration of large amplitude produced by a relatively small vibration near the same frequency of vibration as the natural frequency of the resonating system
sympathetic vibration - (physics) vibration produced by resonance
3.oscillation - a single complete execution of a periodically repeated phenomenon; "a year constitutes a cycle of the seasons"
periodic event, recurrent event - an event that recurs at intervals
cardiac cycle - the complete cycle of events in the heart from the beginning of one heart beat to the beginning of the next; an electrical impulse conducted through the heart muscle that constricts the atria which is followed by constriction of the ventricles; "the cardiac cycle can be shown on an electrocardiogram"
Carnot cycle, Carnot's ideal cycle - a cycle (of expansion and compression) of an idealized reversible heat engine that does work without loss of heat
pass - one complete cycle of operations (as by a computer); "it was not possible to complete the computation in a single pass"
menstrual cycle - a recurring cycle (beginning at menarche and ending at menopause) in which the endometrial lining of the uterus prepares for pregnancy; if pregnancy does not occur the lining is shed at menstruation; "the average menstrual cycle is 28 days"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

oscillation

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

oscillation

[ˌɒsɪˈleɪʃən] N
1. (Phys) → oscilación f; [of prices] → fluctuación f
2. (fig) → oscilación f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

oscillation

[ˌɒsɪˈleɪʃən] n
(= movement) [object] → oscillation f
(= variation) → oscillation f
oscillations in sth [+ level, value, temperature] → oscillations de qch
oscillation between → oscillation entre
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

oscillation

n (Phys) → Oszillation f, → Schwingung f; (of compass needle etc) → Schwanken nt; (rapid) → Zittern nt; (= individual movement etc)Schwankung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

oscillation

[ˌɒsɪˈleɪʃn] noscillazione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

os·cil·la·tion

n. oscilación, movimiento de vaivén, tal como el de un péndulo.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
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Ample supply of low-cost HFO to fuel scrubber-equipped ships as well as ultra-low-sulfur-fuel for the rest of the fleet has been secured through stakes in the marine-fuel JV.
One of those countries is Madagascar, a user of HFO derived from the country's heavy oil reserves.
The DCE, since 2008, adopted the HFO where he annually celebrated his birthday with the children, and fortunately, when he became the DCE of the Ningo-Prampram District, Mr Doku, in June 2018, promised to provide a classroom block for the nursery department of the outreach.
Other LowGWP HFO molecules - SolsticeA(r) HFO 1234ze (E) and SolsticeA(r) HFO 1234zd - were also introduced by Honeywell; they show excellent application properties as both refrigerant and solvent.
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According to the IPPs projects, Summit, the largest (IPP) in the country has completed construction of HFO fueled reciprocating power plant with 300 MW capacity.
Although previous studies investigated the role of mask [O.sub.2] and HFO treatments following CPB, none of these studies have compared these two different treatment modalities in patients with BMI more than 30kg/[m.sup.2].
Amir Naqvi, the regional marketing leader, Honeywell Fluorine Products, Middle East, Turkey, and Africa, said: "Honeywell remains committed to supplying next-generation, environmentally-preferable HFO alternatives to support the GCC industries on accelerating the transition from hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and other high-GWP materials."
Amir Naqvi, regional marketing leader of Honeywell Fluorine Products, Middle East, Turkey, and Africa, said: "Honeywell remains committed to supplying next-generation, environmentally preferable HFO alternatives to support the regional Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) industries on accelerating the transition from hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and other high-GWP materials.
At that meeting, Canada, along with a number of Arctic and non-Arctic member-states, will propose a strategy for limiting the use and transport of HFO by ships in the Arctic.
HFO has been the "king of marine fuels" since the 1960s, but only in recent years has it come under increased scrutiny.
"As the Middle East transitions to more environmentally preferable cooling solutions, Honeywell's hydrofluoro-olefin (HFO) refrigerants are immediately available, near drop-in alternatives that offer superior performance and energy savings."