HMO


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HMO

 (āch′ĕm-ō′)
n.
A health care plan in which medical costs are controlled by limiting services to a specific network of medical personnel and facilities and usually by requiring referral by a primary-care physician for specialty care.

[h(ealth) m(aintenance) o(rganization).]

HMO

health maintenance organization: a prepaid health plan in which subscribers receive comprehensive health services provided by member physicians and other health-care providers, usu. in a central facility.
[1970–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.HMO - group insurance that entitles members to services of participating hospitals and clinics and physiciansHMO - group insurance that entitles members to services of participating hospitals and clinics and physicians
health insurance - insurance against loss due to ill health
Translations

HMO

abbr health maintenance organization. V. organization.
References in periodicals archive ?
It gets the employer out of the business of deciding or controlling or favoring one HMO or insurance arrangement over another.
Today, Kaiser Permanente says it is the largest nonprofit HMO in the United States.
The Medicare HMO plans got a shot in the arm by federal Medicare reform act funds, with higher values reversing a two-year decline across the state.
Not long after our first meeting, Butler and Veneman convinced the Nixon White House to adopt the HMO approach.
Data are from the 124 counties with the largest TEFRA-risk HMO enrollment using 1993-1994 Medicare Denominator files for beneficiaries enrolled in the FFS and TEFRA-risk HMO sectors.
Making a Killing: HMOs and the Threat to Your Health by Jamie Court (Editor) and Francis Smith, with a foreword by Ralph Nader Common Courage.
As the Social HMO gets more attention, people will begin to see that long-term care benefits can be provided at no added cost to the government.
Health Maintenance Organization of Pennsylvania, which also involved a suit against an HMO for the alleged negligence of an affiliated physician.
Polls indicate that if we had been asked, we would have responded with a loud "no" Polls taken in the early 1990s revealed that Americans rejected the proposition that HMO rationing was essential to constraining health care inflation, and polls taken since the HMO coup in the mid-1990s indicate a sizable majority of Americans believe the new HMO-dominated system threatens quality of care.
The recourse for patients who lose their best chance is limited; although patients can sue HMO doctors under malpractice law, a federal shield law bars most consumers from suing HMOs for bad medical decisions.
The surveyed HMOs include 15 HMOs currently serving rural Medicare risk enrollees, 1 HMO that recently dropped its Medicare risk contract to serve rural enrollees, and 11 HMOs that have commercial enrollees in 5 or more rural counties, but no rural Medicare risk enrollees.
This trend started in 1996, reports California Medicine, when Blue Shield offered its Access+ HMO plan.