HTML


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HTML

 (āch′tē-ĕm-ĕl′)
n.
A markup language used to structure text and multimedia documents and to set up hypertext links between documents, used extensively on the World Wide Web.

[H(yper)t(ext) M(arkup) L(anguage).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

HTML

abbreviation for
(Computer Science) hypertext markup language: a text description language that is used for electronic publishing, esp on the internet
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

HTML

HyperText Markup Language: a set of standards, a variety of SGML, used to tag the elements of a hypertext document, the standard for documents on the World Wide Web.
[1990–95]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

HTML

Hypertext Markup Language; the format that all web pages are set up in.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.HTML - a set of tags and rules (conforming to SGML) for using them in developing hypertext documentsHTML - a set of tags and rules (conforming to SGML) for using them in developing hypertext documents
markup language - a set of symbols and rules for their use when doing a markup of a document
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

HTML

N ABBR =hypertext markup languageHTML m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

HTML

[ˈeɪtʃˌtiːɛmˈɛl] (=hypertext markup language)
nHTML m
modif [document] → en langage HTML
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

HTML

(Comput) abbr of hypertext mark-up languageHTML
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Early adopters recognized that most end-users were paralyzed by the unfamiliar interface provided by Web applications built on HTML. Because first-generation Web applications relied solely on HTML, even simple tasks would reload the browser with a new Web page after every mouse click-clearly limiting business productivity.
As a subset of SGML, HTML is useful for publishing documents on Internet Web sites and does not require DTDs to be created.
Since late June of last year, companies filing their financial information have been able to submit most filings in either ASCII or HTML; at some point HTML will replace ASCII in all filings, but the migration is not yet mandatory.
The same concepts and commands are used in each application, regardless of whether a final document is prepared in the original file format or converted to HTML.
The World Wide Web (WWW) is written in Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML), a library of "tags" that, when woven together, create Web pages.
HTML falls far short of the full power of SGML, and it suffers from the intermixing of structural markup (identifying the elements of a document) and display, or procedural markup (specification of how objects should be displayed on a page or screen).
XML has numerous advantages over HTML. It is easily transformable and can describe any type of content.