footbag

(redirected from Hacky-sack)
Related to Hacky-sack: DDR

foot·bag

 (fo͝ot′băg′)
n.
1. A small round bag filled with plastic pellets or other material and used in games that require its being kept aloft with the feet.
2. Any of the games in which such a bag is used.

footbag

(ˈfʊtˌbæɡ)
n
1. (Ball Games, other than specified) the sport of keeping a small round object, usually a beanbag, off the ground by kicking it
2. (Ball Games, other than specified) a small beanbag that is kicked around
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References in periodicals archive ?
Library Director Christine Flaherty got a laugh from the audience when she mentioned her son was arrested by West years ago for playing Hacky-Sack in the park.
t was playing hacky-sack, tra-la-ing down Saint Street
And New York's Lizzie Owens' Highland guy loafs around with stoners and hacky-sack players more than Alpha-dogs.
A nearby older dude remarked to his even-older friend, "It looks like they're playing hacky-sack.
It doesn't take a genius to see where this is headed: romance/conflicts with Dalia, battles between Arabs and Israelis, the reappearance of the Phantom, a grudge over a goat and Mariah Carey singing the national anthem at a hacky-sack contest.
The other teacher is a former college hacky-sack champion and a veteran of several anti-war demonstrations in DC.
On a cold January day with a northwest wind whipping snow sideways, Cambrian College instructor Bruce Cowton had his first-year powerline technician apprentices-in-training harnessed and aloft 15 feet on poles hand-tossing a hacky-sack to one another.
The teacher tosses a small ball, hacky-sack, or koosh ball to a student who then responds to the prompt.
These bags are made to last, too, from the highest quality material, so your giant hacky-sack will certainly stand the test of time Do-Nut - pounds 149 from www.
With the input of physics and art teachers, Smith has directed students to use 3-D computer-assisted design software to create plans for a robot that can move and sling a hacky-sack across the classroom.
He enjoyed camping, swimming, fishing at Sharps Creek, looking for mushrooms, playing hacky-sack and riding his Harley.
Robin, who is co-author of the book Your Money or Your Life, which presents a model for happy living with reduced consumption, likens a good conversation to a game of hacky-sack, where group participation is the leading factor for success: "The point is to keep the ball up and in play, not to make the defining move.