Hadrian's Wall

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Ha·dri·an's Wall

 (hā′drē-ənz)
An ancient Roman wall, 118.3 km (73.5 mi) long, across northern England. Built by the emperor Hadrian c. ad 122-130 and extended by Severus a century later, the wall marked the northern defensive boundary of Roman Britain. Fragmentary ruins of the wall remain.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Hadrian's Wall

n
(Placename) a fortified Roman wall, of which substantial parts remain, extending across N England from the Solway Firth in the west to the mouth of the River Tyne in the east. It was built in 120–123 ad on the orders of the emperor Hadrian as a defence against the N British tribes
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ha′drian's Wall′


n.
a wall of defense for the Roman province of Britain, built by Hadrian between Solway Firth and the mouth of the Tyne.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hadrian's Wall - an ancient Roman wall built by Hadrian in the 2nd centuryHadrian's Wall - an ancient Roman wall built by Hadrian in the 2nd century; marked the northern boundary of the Roman Empire in Britain
England - a division of the United Kingdom
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