hadrosaur

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had·ro·saur

 (hăd′rə-sôr′)
n.

[From New Latin Hadrosaurus, genus name; see hadrosaurus.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hadrosaur

(ˈhædrəˌsɔː) or

hadrosaurus

n
(Palaeontology) any one of a large group of bipedal Upper Cretaceous dinosaurs of the genus Anatosaurus, Maiasaura, Edmontosaurus, and related genera: partly aquatic, with a duck-billed skull and webbed feet. Also called: duck-billed dinosaur
[C19: from Greek hadros thick, fat + -saur]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

had•ro•saur

(ˈhæd rəˌsɔr)

n.
any chiefly bipedal herbivorous dinosaur of the family Hadrosauridae, of the Cretaceous Period, having a broad toothless beak.
Also called duck-billed dinosaur.
[< New Latin Hadrosaurus (1858) genus name = Greek hadr(ós) thick, bulky + -o- -o- + saûros -saur]
had`ro•sau′ri•an, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

had·ro·saur

(hăd′rə-sôr′)
Any of various medium-sized to large plant-eating dinosaurs of the Cretaceous Period that had a duck-like bill, hoofed feet, and many series of rough grinding teeth. The hadrosaurs were the last group of ornithopod dinosaurs. Also called duck-billed dinosaur.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hadrosaur - any of numerous large bipedal ornithischian dinosaurs having a horny duck-like bill and webbed feethadrosaur - any of numerous large bipedal ornithischian dinosaurs having a horny duck-like bill and webbed feet; may have been partly aquatic
ornithischian, ornithischian dinosaur - herbivorous dinosaur with a pelvis like that of a bird
family Hadrosauridae, Hadrosauridae - duck-billed dinosaurs; upper Cretaceous
anatotitan - one of the largest and most famous duck-billed dinosaurs
corythosaur, corythosaurus - duck-billed dinosaur with nasal passages that expand into a crest like a hollow helmet
edmontosaurus - duck-billed dinosaur from Canada found as a fossilized mummy with skin
trachodon, trachodont - large duck-billed dinosaur of the Cretaceous period
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, hadrosaurs (formerly known as duck-billed dinosaurs) have long been ingrained in our knowledge of dinosaurs that whenever we hear the term, an image of a four-legged reptile with a flat duck-like mouth comes to mind.
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- The duck-billed hadrosaurs walked the Earth over 90-million years ago and were one of the most successful groups of dinosaurs.
Comparing Gobihadros to Asian species within Hadrosauridae, the researchers concluded that Gobihadros did not directly give rise to later Asian hadrosaurs.
Measuring more than 40 feet from their duckbilled heads to the end of their tails, these reptiles, the largest of the hadrosaurs, gorged themselves on the abundant supply of kelp and seaweed that continued to wash up along the shoreline with the incoming tide.
According to the fossil record, hadrosaurs were herbivorous dinosaurs that lived in different parts of the world including Asia and North America.
"Hadrosaurs, according to the traditional understanding, were mainly limited to the northern continents: North America, Europe, Asia," Eric Buffetaut, lead author of the study said.
Chin thinks that local dinosaurs " probably the duck-billed group called hadrosaurs " went in search of dietary supplements near the shoreline."You get so many invertebrates hanging out in rotting logs," she says."There's bugs to eat, and rotting detritus " it's a really rich place." The fungi that helped to break down the logs would also have provided extra protein.
LEFT: Karen Chin, palaeontologist, RIGHT: Scientists say the plant-eating dinosaurs were probably hadrosaurs, large duck-billed dinosaurs that ate plants and thrived in the area.
Duck-billed hadrosaurs roamed in great herds, leaving tracks as small as softballs and as large as hula hoops.
The occurrence of these so-called duck-billed dinosaurs in the region issurprising: Hadrosaurs, according to the traditional understanding, were mainly limited to the northern continents: North America, Europe, Asia, Eric Buffetaut, lead author of the study says, Their presence much further south, in this part ofthe world, was previously unknown.
Evans (eds.), Hadrosaurs: Proceedings of the International Hadrosaur Symposium at the Royal Tyrrell Museum.