hemolytic anemia

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Related to Haemolytic disease: Haemolytic disease of newborn

hemolytic anemia

n.
Anemia resulting from the lysis of red blood cells, as in response to certain toxic or infectious agents and in certain inherited blood disorders.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hemolytic anemia - anemia resulting from destruction of erythrocytes
anemia, anaemia - a deficiency of red blood cells
Translations

he·mo·lyt·ic a·ne·mi·a

n. anemia hemolítica, anemia congénita causada por agentes tóxicos de eritrocitos frágiles de forma esferoidal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rh-D haemolytic disease of foetus and newborn (HDFN) is an ailment in which lifespan of infant's erythrocytes were shortened by the action of placentally transferred maternal anti-D specific for inherited paternal red cell antigens.
The length of this course is four weeks in duration and contains units of study covering the theoretical and practical aspects of the following topics: routine blood grouping, blood group antigens, crossmatch techniques, antibody detection, transfusion reactions, haemolytic disease of the newborn, screening blood for infectious agents, blood donor selection, organisation of a blood bank and the appropriate use of blood components in transfusion medicine.
the diagnostic laboratory provides a service to quantify the levels of allo immune and prophylactic anti-d and allo immune anti-c in patient samples for pregnant females at risk of haemolytic disease of the fetus and new born (hdfn).
Morbidity of ABO haemolytic disease in the newborn.
Biotherapies are also used in the rapid reversal of warfarin and to prevent haemolytic disease in new-born infants resulting from Rh factor incompatibilities.
The most common cause of jaundice in the first 24 hours of life due to haemolytic disease of newborn (HDN) is rhesus (Rh) haemolytic disease2 followed by ABO incompatibility that may cause elevated levels of bilirubin and anaemia but less severe than Rh haemolytic disease.
7] They concluded that it is unnecessary to keep infants in hospital to check rebound, but recommended follow-up measurement of the bilirubin level for infants who required phototherapy during hospitalisation and for those with haemolytic disease.
First report from India of haemolytic disease of the newborn by anti-C and anti-E in Rh (D) positive mothers.
1,2] Some of the most common causes of neonatal jaundice include physiological jaundice, breast feeding or non feeding jaundice, breast milk jaundice, prematurity leading to jaundice & various pathological causes like haemolytic disease, liver dysfunction, neonatal sepsis, deficiency of G6PD enzyme, hypothyroidism and rare conditions such as gilbert's syndrome etc.