haemophilia

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haemophilia

(ˌhiːməʊˈfɪlɪə; ˌhɛm-) or

hemophilia

n
(Pathology) an inheritable disease, usually affecting only males but transmitted by women to their male children, characterized by loss or impairment of the normal clotting ability of blood so that a minor wound may result in fatal bleeding
ˌhaemoˈphiliˌoid, ˌhemoˈphiliˌoid adj

hemophilia, haemophilia

a tendency to uncontrolled bleeding. Also hemorrhaphilia, haemorrhaphilia. — hemophiliac, haemophiliac, n., adj.
See also: Blood and Blood Vessels
an hereditary tendency, in males, toward a deficiency in coagulation factors in the blood. — hemophiliac, haemophiliac, n., adj.
See also: Disease and Illness
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.haemophilia - congenital tendency to uncontrolled bleedinghaemophilia - congenital tendency to uncontrolled bleeding; usually affects males and is transmitted from mother to son
classical haemophilia, classical hemophilia, haemophilia A, hemophilia A - hemophilia caused by a congenital deficiency of factor VIII; occurs almost exclusively in men
Christmas disease, haemophilia B, hemophilia B - a clotting disorder similar to hemophilia A but caused by a congenital deficiency of factor IX
angiohemophilia, vascular hemophilia, von Willebrand's disease - a form of hemophilia discovered by Erik von Willebrand; a genetic disorder that is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait; characterized by a deficiency of the coagulation factor and by mucosal bleeding
blood disease, blood disorder - a disease or disorder of the blood
sex-linked disorder - any disease or abnormality that is determined by the sex hormones; "hemophilia is determined by a gene defect on an X chromosome"
Translations
hemofilia

haemophilia

hemophilia (US) [ˌhiːməʊˈfɪlɪə] Nhemofilia f

haemophilia

[ˌhiːməˈfɪliə] hemophilia (US) nhémophilie f

haemophilia

, (US) hemophilia
nBluterkrankheit f, → Hämophilie f (spec)

haemophilia

hemophilia (Am) [ˌhiːməʊˈfɪlɪə] nemofilia
References in periodicals archive ?
This week saw previously unseen Cabinet documents emerge which show senior ministers in the 1987 Conservative government pursued a "policy of not accepting any direct responsibility" for allowing contaminated blood products to be given to haemophiliacs.
He said the government is fully conscious of its responsibility and has managed to provide Factor 8 and 9 (used for blood coagulation), to around 3000 haemophiliacs in need.
A few decades ago haemophiliacs spent a lot of time in various hospitals having blood transfusions, rest and other treatments, even being sent away to special schools for education, Fielden Hospital near Todmorden in our case.
A lot of haemophiliacs died with society looking down on them because of the way HIV used to be viewed.
Although inherently challenging, the management of haemophiliacs has been dramatically improved over the last decades.
NEARLY 2,000 haemophiliacs in the UK have died as a result of being given polluted blood which was administered to nearly 5,000 patients with haemophilia in the 1970s and 1980s.
The majority of haemophiliacs who contracted HIV from contaminated blood products were already infected before doctors understood the disease, an inquiry heard yesterday.
Ian Franklin, professor of transfusion medicine at the University of Glasgow, told the independent inquiry into the deaths of nearly 2,000 haemophiliacs exposed to HIV and hepatitis C that concerns about HIV/Aids infection were first raised in 1983.
More than 2,000 haemophiliacs died as a result of exposure to the fatal viruses in what fertility expert Lord Winston dubbed "the worst treatment disaster in the history of the NHS".
THE "tragedy" of thousands of haemophiliacs who contracted life-threatening diseases after being exposed to contaminated blood products should never have happened, an independent public inquiry was told.
The first full hearing of an independent public inquiry into the supply of contaminated NHS blood to haemophiliacs, called the "the worst treatment disaster in the history of the NHS", was opening today.