Hague


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Related to Hague: Hague Convention

Hague

 (hāg), The or 's Gra·ven·ha·ge (skrä′vən-hä′gə, sKHrä′vən-hä′KHə)
The de facto capital of the Netherlands, in the western part of the country near the North Sea. The Hague grew around a palace built c. 1250 by William of Holland (1228-1256) and is today the seat of the country's legislature and supreme court and of the International Court of Justice.

Hague

(heɪɡ)
n
(Placename) The Hague the seat of government of the Netherlands and capital of South Holland province, situated about 3 km (2 miles) from the North Sea. Pop: 464 000 (2003 est). Dutch names: 's Gravenhage or Den Haag

Hague

(heɪɡ)
n
(Biography) William Jefferson. born 1961, British politician; leader of the Conservative party (1997–2001); foreign secretary from 2010; as a writer he is noted for his biography of William Pitt the Younger (2004)

Hague

(heɪg)

n.
The, a city in the W Netherlands, near the North Sea: site of the government and the royal residence. 444,313. Dutch, Den Haag , 's Gravenhage. Compare Amsterdam.
Translations

Hague

[heɪg] N The HagueLa Haya

Hague

[ˈheɪg] n
The Hague → La Haye

Hague

n the HagueDen Haag nt; in the Haguein Den Haag; the Hague Conventions (Pol) → die Haager Abkommen; the Hague Tribunal (Pol) → der Internationale Gerichtshof

Hague

[heɪg] n the Haguel'Aia
References in classic literature ?
I am on my way to The Hague. I was to have gone by the boat train which left half an hour ago.
"What is the nature of your pressing business at The Hague?" he asked.
Here, in almost the first paragraph, he saw the name which had happened to catch his eye a moment or two before: GOLF AT THE HAGUE Among the entrants for the tournament which commences to-morrow, are several well-known English players, including Mr.
Shall we not see him pale, streaming with blood, covered with shame?" And was not this a sweet triumph for the burghers of the Hague, whose envy even beat that of the common rabble; a triumph in which every honest citizen and townsman might be expected to share?
"Besides which," the fierce enemies of France chimed in, "if the work were done well and bravely at the Hague, Cornelius would certainly not be allowed to go into exile, where he will renew his intrigues with France, and live with his big scoundrel of a brother, John, on the gold of the Marquis de Louvois."
Being in such a temper, people generally will run rather than walk; which was the reason why the inhabitants of the Hague were hurrying so fast towards the Buytenhof.
The men on their horses, indeed, stood like so many statues, under the eye of their chief, Count Tilly, the captain of the mounted troops of the Hague, who had his sword drawn, but held it with its point downwards, in a line with the straps of his stirrup.
He enjoined his men to be ready to set out for the Hague, some following the coast which leads to Breskens, others the road to Antwerp.
A fortnight after all we have said had taken place at Calais, the whole troop assembled at the Hague.
had a little cooled the protection afforded him up to that time, and in consequence he had gone to reside in a little village house at Scheveningen, situated in the downs, on the sea-shore, about a league from the Hague.
And yet while historians have placed Hague in the club of corrupt politicians, such as James Curley of Boston and Daley of Chicago, unlike his peers whose reputations although tainted have been redeemed and presented in a historically balanced way Hague continues to be portrayed as a the quintessential poster child for political corruption.
Summary: n what's being described as a "shift in attitude" by The New York Times, British foreign secretary William Hague appears to be nudged by France to consider a deal to allow dictator Muammar Qaddafi to remain in Libya in exchange for relinquishing power.