Halley's comet

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Hal·ley's comet

 (hăl′ēz, hā′lēz)
n.
A comet with a period of approximately 76 years. The first comet for which a return to the inner solar system was accurately predicted, it last appeared in 1986.

[After Edmund Halley.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Halley's Comet

(ˈhælɪz)
n
(Astronomy) a comet revolving around the sun in a period of about 76 years, last seen in 1985–86
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Hal′ley's com′et

(ˈhæl iz or, often, ˈheɪ liz)
n.
a comet with a period averaging 76 years: most recently visible in 1986.
[after Edmund Halley, who first predicted its return]
pron: The common pronunciation for both the comet and the astronomer Edmund Halley, and the one usu. recommended by astronomers, is (ˈhæl i) However, several spellings of the name, including Hailey and Hawley, were in use during the astronomer's own time, when spellings were not yet fixed, and corresponding pronunciations have survived. The pronunciation (ˈheɪ li) in particular remains associated with Halley's comet; it is less likely to be heard as a pronunciation of Edmund Halley.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Hal·ley's comet

(hăl′ēz, hā′lēz)
A comet that makes one complete orbit around the sun in approximately 76 years. It is visible to the unaided eye and last appeared in 1986.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Halley's comet

A comet that orbits the Sun about every 76 years. It was first recorded in 240 BC, was last seen in 1986, and is next due in 2061.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
References in periodicals archive ?
"Haley's Comet" is a fantasy adventure with a touch of humor.
Like Haley's comet, the Hailey brothers are a unique phenomenon.
The man behind the best rap album ever, 2001, is bringing out his latest Haley's Comet release this year, and Detox is widely tipped as his best yet, and possibly his last ever album of his own.
Haley's Comet came back in the 80s, and the Terminator married Maria Shriver.
Young Dundee striker Andy Ferguson made the first schoolboy error of his embryonic career by answering a question in a newspaper article that seeing me in a first team jersey was about as rare as witnessing Haley's Comet.
Today they have moved into our orbit and it's our duty as punters to take advantage because we'll see odds of 11-8 for Blues for a domestic contest about as rarely as we'll spot Haley's Comet or a Peter Crouch goal.
The sight of Argentina cutting a top eight international side to shreds and racking up a half century is a little bit like the sight of Haley's Comet - we've only seen it once in our life time.
Through the 80s, working and recording extensively in Scandinavia where, curiously, American folk-roots music has a huge following, Russell released a clutch of albums packed with such magnificent songs as Blue Wing, Veteran's Day, Walking On The Moon (one of the world's finest love songs, co-penned with Katy Moffatt), Haley's Comet (about the death of Bill Haley), Navajo Rug (with Ian Tyson) and St Olav's Gate.
MARTYN CORRIGAN goals are as rare as Haley's Comet appearing on a white Christmas in the Sahara Desert.
It happens about as frequently as Haley's comet flies into the trajectory of Earth's orbit, but Arsene Wenger and Sir Alex Ferguson do sometimes manage to agree on something.
People like him come around as regularly as Haley's Comet, so it was unfortunate that The Venue - packed to the rafters and bouncing in unison - cut his set short so they could re-open as a club.