Halifax


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Hal·i·fax

 (hăl′ə-făks′)
1. The capital and largest city of Nova Scotia, Canada, in the south-central part of the province on the Atlantic Ocean. Founded by the British in 1749, it served as an important naval base in the American Revolution, the War of 1812, World War I, and World War II.
2. A town of northeast England northeast of Manchester. It is an industrial center.

Halifax

(ˈhælɪˌfæks)
n
1. (Placename) a port in SE Canada, capital of Nova Scotia, on the Atlantic: founded in 1749 as a British stronghold. Pop: 390 096 (2011)
2. (Placename) a town in N England, in Calderdale unitary authority, West Yorkshire: textiles. Pop: 83 570 (2001)

Halifax

(ˈhælɪˌfæks)
n
1. (Biography) Charles Montagu, Earl of Halifax. 1661–1715, British statesman; founder of the National Debt (1692) and the Bank of England (1694)
2. (Biography) Edward Frederick Lindley Wood, Earl of Halifax. 1881–1959, British Conservative statesman. He was viceroy of India (1926–31), foreign secretary (1938–40), and ambassador to the US (1941–46)
3. (Biography) George Savile, 1st Marquess of Halifax, known as the Trimmer. 1633–95, British politician, noted for his wavering opinions. He opposed the exclusion of the Catholic James II from the throne but later supported the Glorious Revolution

Hal•i•fax

(ˈhæl əˌfæks)

n.
1. the capital of Nova Scotia, in SE Canada. 114,455.
2. a city in West Yorkshire, in N central England. 91,171.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Halifax - provincial capital and largest city of Nova ScotiaHalifax - provincial capital and largest city of Nova Scotia
Nova Scotia - the Canadian province in the Maritimes consisting of the Nova Scotia peninsula and Cape Breton Island; French settlers who called the area Acadia were exiled to Louisiana by the British in the 1750s and their descendants are know as Cajuns
References in classic literature ?
He turned back, hurried to Long Wharf without looking behind him, embarked with the British troops for Halifax, and never saw his country more.
My mother's name is Aurelia Randall; our names are Hannah Lucy Randall, Rebecca Rowena Randall, John Halifax Randall, Jenny Lind Randall, Marquis Randall, Fanny Ellsler Randall, and Miranda Randall.
He had received information, also, that an armed brig from Halifax, probably at the instigation of the Northwest Company, was hovering on the coast, watching for the Tonquin, with the purpose of impressing the Canadians on board of her, as British subjects, and thus interrupting the voyage.
I sent a line from Halifax, when I felt pretty miserable, but after that I got on delightfully, seldom ill, on deck all day, with plenty of pleasant people to amuse me.
After spending a year in England, he was returning to Halifax, on his way to a government to which he had been appointed, in the West Indies, intending to go to the place where my grand father had sojourned during and since the war, and take him with us.”
After that was a respite in the shape of five years in the Channel squadron, with periodical runs home, and then again he was off to the Mediterranean for three years and to Halifax for four.
I SHALL never forget the one-fourth serious and three-fourths comical astonishment, with which, on the morning of the third of January eighteen-hundred-and-forty-two, I opened the door of, and put my head into, a 'state-room' on board the Britannia steam- packet, twelve hundred tons burthen per register, bound for Halifax and Boston, and carrying Her Majesty's mails.
It was scarcely a time for such inactive musing, when affairs of the deepest moment required the ruler's decision, for within that very hour Hutchinson had received intelligence of the arrival of a British fleet, bringing three regiments from Halifax to overawe the insubordination of the people.
But now that I think of it--Uncle Roger has been teasing her ever since she was in Halifax last summer."
Prior to the Revolution there is a dearth of records; the earlier documents and archives of the Custom-House having, probably, been carried off to Halifax, when all the king's officials accompanied the British army in its flight from Boston.
It does not pay to "fly" minerals and oil a mile farther than is necessary; but the risks of transhipping to submersibles in the ice pack off Nain or Hebron are so great that these heavy freighters fly down to Halifax direct, and scent the air as they go.
"I have been a governess for five years," said she, "in the family of Colonel Spence Munro, but two months ago the colonel received an appointment at Halifax, in Nova Scotia, and took his children over to America with him, so that I found myself without a situation.