paua

(redirected from Haliotis iris)
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Related to Haliotis iris: Haliotis australis

paua

(ˈpɑːʊɑ)
n
(Animals) an edible abalone, Haliotis iris, of New Zealand, having an iridescent shell used esp for jewellery
[from Māori]
References in periodicals archive ?
In New Zealand, competent larvae of paua Haliotis iris were experimentally released in a channel of several meters, located on the south coast of the North Island, and they found greater juvenile densities compared with control sites, but concluded that significant advection of larvae out of the channel took place (Tong et al.
Feeding preferences of the abalone Haliotis iris in relation to macroalgal species, attachment, accessibility and water movement.
Techniques for enhancing larval settlement of the abalone, Haliotis iris, on artificial surfaces.
The reported size of the fertilized egg for other Haliotis species was 230 [micro]m in Haliotis discus, 280 [micro]m in Haliotis sieboldii, 270 [micro]m in Haliotis gigantea (Ino 1952), 230 [micro]m in Haliotis iris (Harrison & Grant 1971), 200 [micro]m in Haliotis sorensini (Leighton 1972), and 205[micro]pm Haliotis tuberculata (Courtois de Vicose et al.
as an alternative protein source in artificial diets for Haliotis iris (Martyn, 1784) resulted in the production of animals with heavy meat and shells (Tung & Alfaro 2012).
These structural characteristics have been confirmed in Haliotis iris and Haliotis australis (Wilson & Schiel 1995), Haliotis asinina (Capinpin et al.
Experimental evaluation of commercial-scale enhancement of abalone Haliotis iris populations in New Zealand.
A comparison of metabolic stress during air exposure in two species of New Zealand abalone, Haliotis iris and Haliotis australis: implications for the handling and shipping of live animals.
Several studies have assessed the natural diets of adult abalone, based on stomach content of Haliotis cracherodii (Leighton & Boolootian 1963), Haliotis iris and Haliotis australis (Poore 1972), Haliotis midae (Barkai & Griffiths 1986), and Haliotis asinine (Sawatpeera et al.
Moreover, numerically higher feed intake and significantly higher shell growth rates (15%) were reported for Haliotis iris fed a formulated diet with dried, mulched Gracilaria spp.