hallstand

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Related to Hall Tree: coat rack, coat tree, IKEA

hallstand

(ˈhɔːlˌstænd) or

hall tree

n
(Furniture) a piece of furniture on which are hung coats, hats, etc
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hallstand - a piece of furniture where coats and hats and umbrellas can be hung; usually has a mirror
article of furniture, furniture, piece of furniture - furnishings that make a room or other area ready for occupancy; "they had too much furniture for the small apartment"; "there was only one piece of furniture in the room"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The largest tree decorated was the Arlington Heights Village Hall tree. This tree was done in the theme of "Winter Wonderland", covered in snowflakes and icicles.
A CGI of one of the planned Ramside Hall tree house suites
Items include, fittingly, a shoe cabinet, as well as a Silhouette hall tree, the first of its kind for the company, with two drawers and seven hooks that can be flipped down when needed.
Andrew's, commonly known as the Kirk, recently held an auction and dessert party with proceeds going towards the recent church renovations (a new entrance to the basement, new stairways, an elevator, an accessible washroom and a new meeting room).This hall tree was made by Kirk minister, Rev.
STEADY In place 2 ULSTER SAYS GLOW Santa at Belfast City Hall yesterday DECK THE HALL Tree sits ready for decorations work 3
While Dickmann had seen a number of successful vignettes, we decided to incorporate stations for office, vanity, baby care, hall tree, and kitchens throughout the dementia/Alzheimer's floor at Querencia.
Among his recently completed projects on display at Architectural Salvage are wine stoppers he fashioned out of old doorknobs and ceramic faucet handles, priced at $19; a 53-inch-long bench made from a four-panel door salvaged from an old house in the Payne Park area, priced at $225; and a hall tree made from two four-panel doors from a remodeled home on Osprey Avenue.
In a 1994 essay on the restoration of his house in upstate New York, he notes that "nostalgia, if it isn't good for anything else, seems to elicit poetry." Nostalgia (literally, the ache to go home) certainly elicits poetry here, the poems filled with things of an earlier, dowdier American culture: a darning egg, deviled eggs, glycerin, a hall tree, "prelapsarian school picnics," sugar tongs, and "Walsh's, with its fancy grocery department." In another poet's work, such things might appear in a sticky, contrived spot of time or in a merely ironic bit of kitsch.
Maybe I could turn my metal hall tree into a trellis for morning glories.