Halley's comet


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Hal·ley's comet

 (hăl′ēz, hā′lēz)
n.
A comet with a period of approximately 76 years. The first comet for which a return to the inner solar system was accurately predicted, it last appeared in 1986.

[After Edmund Halley.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Halley's Comet

(ˈhælɪz)
n
(Astronomy) a comet revolving around the sun in a period of about 76 years, last seen in 1985–86
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Hal′ley's com′et

(ˈhæl iz or, often, ˈheɪ liz)
n.
a comet with a period averaging 76 years: most recently visible in 1986.
[after Edmund Halley, who first predicted its return]
pron: The common pronunciation for both the comet and the astronomer Edmund Halley, and the one usu. recommended by astronomers, is (ˈhæl i) However, several spellings of the name, including Hailey and Hawley, were in use during the astronomer's own time, when spellings were not yet fixed, and corresponding pronunciations have survived. The pronunciation (ˈheɪ li) in particular remains associated with Halley's comet; it is less likely to be heard as a pronunciation of Edmund Halley.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Hal·ley's comet

(hăl′ēz, hā′lēz)
A comet that makes one complete orbit around the sun in approximately 76 years. It is visible to the unaided eye and last appeared in 1986.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Halley's comet

A comet that orbits the Sun about every 76 years. It was first recorded in 240 BC, was last seen in 1986, and is next due in 2061.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
References in classic literature ?
Of course we think a good deal of Jupiter, because our world is only a potato to it, for size; but then there are worlds in other systems that Jupiter isn't even a mustard-seed to - like the planet Goobra, for instance, which you couldn't squeeze inside the orbit of Halley's comet without straining the rivets.
Based on Newton's work, Halley made his famous prediction that the comet of 1682 (Halley's comet) would return to view in 1758.
The Eta Aquarids are generally active from mid-April to late May and are (http://earthsky.org/astronomy-essentials/everything-you-need-to-know-eta-aquarid-meteor-shower) created when the Earth passes through streams of dust cast off from Halley's Comet.
With larger and larger telescopes being built, will it ever be possible to observe Halley's Comet around its entire orbit?
On This Day: 837: Halley's comet passed close to Earth.
"You can be absolutely sure that if you have a handful of particles from Greenland material, you've got pieces of Halley's comet, pieces of Kohoutek and pieces of Swift-Tuttle,' he says.
The Orionids are essentially fragments of Halley's Comet, relatively small chunks of ice, rocks, and minerals that were left behind when the comet last passed through the inner solar system in 1986.
Personally, I define it as "you'll see Halley's Comet before you see your feet again".
That limit is set by the belt's observed lack of gravitational influence on the orbit of Halley's Comet.
11, however, it radioed back what IUE officials call "the first image of Halley's comet ever recorded from space."
This weekend, Earth is going to pass through a cloud of rock and ice left by Halley's Comet, which gives rise to the Orionid meteor shower.
How often (to the nearest year) can Halley's comet be seen from Earth?