Hallowmas


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Hal·low·mas

also Hal·low·mass  (hăl′ō-məs, -măs′)
n. Archaic
All Saints' Day.

[Short for Allhallowmas.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Hallowmas

(ˈhæləʊˌmæs) or

Hallowmass

n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) archaic the feast celebrating All Saints' Day
[C14: see Allhallows, Mass]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Hal•low•mas

(ˈhæl oʊ məs, -ˌmæs)

n.
the feast of Allhallows or All Saints' Day, on Nov. 1.
[1375–1425; late Middle English; short for Allhallowmas, Middle English alhalwemesse, Old English ealra hālgena mæsse mass of all saints]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hallowmas - a Christian feast day honoring all the saintsHallowmas - a Christian feast day honoring all the saints; first observed in 835
holy day of obligation - a day when Catholics must attend Mass and refrain from servile work, and Episcopalians must take Communion
Nov, November - the month following October and preceding December
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Also known as Hallowmas, All Hallows, Solemnity of Saints and Feast of all Saints, the holiday is dedicated to honoring saints of the Catholic Church who have reached heaven.
It derives from the late Medieval practice of souling, when poor folk would go door to door on Hallowmas (November 1), receiving food in return for prayers for the dead on All Souls' Day (November 2).
Hallowmas or All Hallows is a term for All Saints' Day.
Trick-or-treating resembles the late Medieval practice of souling, when poor folk would go door-to-door on Hallowmas, November 1, receiving food in return for prayers for the dead on All Souls Day, November 2.
In The Two Gentlemen of Verona (Act 2, Scene 1) Shakespeare wrote (probably in the late 1 580s or early 1590s) that one could tell a man in love because he starts 'to speak puling, like a beggar at Hallowmas'.
Also known as All Hallows or Hallowmas and observed by Roman Catholics and some western Protestant churches, this feast day honors all saints, known and unknown.
Judeo-Christian Mystery Play: John Bender explains the liturgical, seasonal implications of the play's performance at Hallowmas, when one could invoke judgment against oppressors, discover true love, and eliminate winter by "ritual divinations" like the masque.