hamlet

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ham·let

 (hăm′lĭt)
n.
1. A small village.
2. In New York state, an unincorporated community that is within a town and is not a part of a village.

[Middle English hamelet, from Old French, diminutive of hamel, diminutive of ham, village, of Germanic origin; see tkei- in Indo-European roots.]

hamlet

(ˈhæmlɪt)
n
1. a small village or group of houses
2. (in Britain) a village without its own church
[C14: from Old French hamelet, diminutive of hamel, from ham, of Germanic origin; compare Old English hamm plot of pasture, Low German hamm enclosed land; see home]

ham•let

(ˈhæm lɪt)

n.
a small village.
[1300–50; Middle English hamelet < Middle French, =hamel (diminutive of ham < Germanic; see home) + -et -et]

Ham•let

(ˈhæm lɪt)

n.
the hero of a tragedy by Shakespeare, Hamlet (1603), a young prince who avenges the murder of his father.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hamlet - a community of people smaller than a villagehamlet - a community of people smaller than a village
community - a group of people living in a particular local area; "the team is drawn from all parts of the community"
2.Hamlet - the hero of William Shakespeare's tragedy who hoped to avenge the murder of his father
3.hamlet - a settlement smaller than a townhamlet - a settlement smaller than a town  
settlement - an area where a group of families live together
campong, kampong - a native village in Malaysia
kraal - a village of huts for native Africans in southern Africa; usually surrounded by a stockade
pueblo - a communal village built by Indians in the southwestern United States
Translations
landsby
küla
kirkonkyläkyläkyläpahanentaloryhmä
falucska
村落集落
viculusvicus
siołowioska
by

hamlet

[ˈhæmlɪt] Naldea f, caserío m

hamlet

[ˈhæmlɪt] nhameau m

hamlet

nWeiler m, → kleines Dorf

hamlet

[ˈhæmlɪt] npaesetto, paesino
References in classic literature ?
About twelve by the moon-dial One, more filmy than the rest(A kind which, upon trial, They have found to be the best) Comes down - still down - and down With its centre on the crown Of a mountain's eminence, While its wide circumference In easy drapery falls Over hamlets, over halls, Wherever they may be - O'er the strange woods - o'er the sea - Over spirits on the wing - Over every drowsy thing - And buries them up quite In a labyrinth of light - And then, how deep
Lewis, 'The Genesis of Hamlet,' on which the theories here stated are partly based; A.
The original version of the Hamlet story is a brief narrative in the legendary so-called 'Danish History,' written in Latin by the Dane Saxo the Grammarian about the year 1200.
As soon as the play, which was Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, began, Partridge was all attention, nor did he break silence till the entrance of the ghost; upon which he asked Jones, "What man that was in the strange dress; something," said he, "like what I have seen in a picture.
Then turning his eyes again upon Hamlet, "Ay, you may draw your sword; what signifies a sword against the power of the devil?
I am not sure but I should put him beside Hamlet, and on the name level, for the merit of his artistic completeness, and at one time I much preferred him, or at least his humor.
Something must speedily be resolved upon, and it occurred to us at last to go forth together and seek help in the neighbouring hamlet.
The hamlet lay not many hundred yards away, though out of view, on the other side of the next cove; and what greatly encouraged me, it was in an opposite direction from that whence the blind man had made his appearance and whither he had presumably returned.
You're out in your reading of Hamlet when you get your legs in profile.
Miserably I went to bed after all, and miserably thought of Estella, and miserably dreamed that my expectations were all cancelled, and that I had to give my hand in marriage to Herbert's Clara, or play Hamlet to Miss Havisham's Ghost, before twenty thousand people, without knowing twenty words of it.
She was gone to Sloman's End, a hamlet about three miles off, over the hill, the old woman told him--had set off directly after morning chapel, to preach in a cottage there, as her habit was.
At five in the cold winter's morning the bugles were blowing in the hamlet of St.