Southampton

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South·amp·ton

 (south-hămp′tən, sou-thămp′-)
1. A city of south-central England on an inlet of the English Channel opposite the Isle of Wight. Founded on the site of Roman and Saxon settlements, it has long been a major port, especially for passenger ships.
2. A village of southeast New York on the southeast coast of Long Island. It is primarily a summer resort.

Southampton

, Third Earl of Title of Henry Wriothesley. 1573-1624.
English politician, soldier, and patron of Shakespeare as well as a number of other Elizabethan poets. Shakespeare's Venus and Adonis and Rape of Lucrece are dedicated to him.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Southampton

(saʊθˈæmptən; -ˈhæmp-)
n
1. (Placename) a port in S England, in Southampton unitary authority, Hampshire on Southampton Water (an inlet of the English Channel): chief English passenger port; university (1952); shipyards and oil refinery. Pop: 234 224 (2001)
2. (Placename) a unitary authority in S England, in Hampshire. Pop: 221 100 (2003 est). Area: 49 sq km (19 sq miles)

Southampton

(saʊθˈæmptən; -ˈhæmp-)
n
(Biography) 3rd Earl of, title of Henry Wriothesley. 1573–1624, English courtier and patron of Shakespeare, who dedicated Venus and Adonis (1593) and The Rape of Lucrece (1594) to him: sentenced to death (1601) for his part in the Essex rebellion but reprieved
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

South•amp•ton

(saʊθˈæmp tən, -ˈhæmp-)

n.
a seaport in Hampshire county in S England. 215,400.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The branch and members - working at Southampton city council, Hamwic Education Trust, Solent University, Capita Southampton Ltd, Active Nation UK Ltd and elsewhere - have been through a difficult time.
It has been compiled and edited by Margaret Martin, designed by Brian Green of Greenhouse Designs and published by Hamwic. At 336 pages long, the book is filled with personal stories, photographs, maps, documents and cartoons, which have appeared in the newsletter since it began back in the 1980s.
Dunning, the first serious student of Anglo-Saxon and medieval pottery, had identified the continental origins of a miscellany of imported potsherds found on small-scale digs in Hamwic, Anglo-Saxon Southampton, and from building sites in London, and used them as indices of commerce to reconstruct the earliest English long-distance trade with the Frankish kingdoms between the Rhine and Seine.
Their new stadium at St Mary's lies in the heart of the emporium of Hamwic, the precursor of medieval Southampton, beside the River Itchen.
This report publishes the results of an extensive archaeological excavation undertaken in central Southampton, England on the site of what was once the mid-Saxon town of Hamwic. Included are descriptions of 18 cremation burials and 23 inhumation burials from the later 7th or early 8th century, as well as information about the layout and architecture of the settlement.
After that time rats may have disappeared, just as they had disappeared from late Roman Britain, until their arrival once again, but now plague-free, in the towns of the ninth century: a process of extinction and reintroduction characteristic of rat populations.(84) If this was the sequence of events there may be nothing significant in the absence of rats from Hamwic, which was not founded until the early eighth century, or from Anglian York, where the excavated area (and perhaps the whole site) dates only from the very end of the seventh century or the beginning of the eighth.(85) Rats may have come and gone again before these places got going.
Chalton (Hampshire): a small settlement, founded in the late sixth or early seventh century; at its most thriving in the seventh century, it may have lasted into the early eighth, to judge by finds of north French pottery, possibly imported through Hamwic; at no time is it likely to have consisted of more than `three to four fenced farm units'.(144)
But the archaeology of the emporia of Dorestad, Quentovic, Ribe, and Hamwic shows a scale of planning that dwarfs the monastic cities of this age.
The familiar timeline runs as straight as a die through coastal attacks in the early ninth century on to sacks such as those of Hamwic (Saxon Southampton) in 842 and Dorestad, the emporium at the mouth of the Rhine, in 834.
North of the Alps, town life was revived around AD 700 in a particular and almost quarantined sense in a few great places occupying the edges of the North Sea littoral: Rouen, Quentovic, Dorestad, Hamwic (Southampton), Lundenwic (London), Ipswich, Eoforwic (York), Medemblik, Hedeby and Ribe.
The earliest trading-centres were the emporia of the eighth and ninth centuries, mostly founded by or near deserted Romano-British sites, like Hamwic (Southampton), Eoforwic (York) and Lundenwic (London).
But in the decades around 700 at lpswich, London (then called Lundenwic), Southampton (Hamwic) and York (Eoforwic) traders and craftsmen lived in large concentrated settlements near landing places on major rivers that gave them commercial access to the Continent.