handfasting


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hand·fast·ing

 (hănd′făs′tĭng)
n.
1. A Neopagan wedding ceremony in which the participants' hands are ritually joined, in some cases solemnizing a union for a specified term rather than permanently.
2. Archaic A handclasp used as a ceremony of betrothal.

handfasting

(ˈhændˌfɑːstɪŋ)
n
1. an archaic word for betrothal
2. (Historical Terms) (formerly) a kind of trial marriage marked by the formal joining of hands
3. (Alternative Belief Systems) a contemporary pagan (esp Wiccan) marriage ceremony
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References in periodicals archive ?
Fire systems engineer William added: "We are both big Braveheart fans so opted for a traditional Scottish handfasting wedding ceremony, like Mel Gibson's character did at his secret wedding in the film.
It was at one wedding I witnessed all three of handfasting, sand and candle, in a church, with a minister, rings and a block of Corinthians.
Leading away from the norm, they are having a handfasting ceremony with a white witch doing the vows.
The ballad describes informal commitments to marry - handfasting - which are then broken, leading to tragedy.
In the UK's first naked pagan wedding, naturists Jon Donson, 61, and his bride Helen, 48, stripped off with all their friends in the Forest of Dean and tied the knot in a Handfasting Ceremony.
I don't often visualize jumping the broom or handfasting, although those traditions appeal to me.
EMMERDALE Mon-Fri, ITV One week kind-hearted Gennie is ensuring that her cancer-stricken mum Brenda enjoys the poignant handfasting service with Bob before she dies And the next, she is left fighting for her own life after a horrific car crash.
Examples include love letters, handfasting, in-laws, monogamy and more.
You can even take part in a Tudor Handfasting Ceremony (not legally binding
In a traditional Celtic handfasting ceremony, which took place within a series of circles, a High Priestess united the couple under the deities of Rhiannon and Manawyddon - the ancestral guardians of both cultures, who are empowered by earth, air, fire and water.
This brings out the crucial significance of Cranmer's 1549 prayer book, which brought English marriage for the first time wholly within the church building, dispensing with handfasting at the door, and initiated the clerical exhortation on the dignity and honour of marriage which has remained standard to this day.
We arranged for a traditional handfasting ceremony, like the one seen in Braveheart, and organised cakes, a piper, a photographer and a traditional Scottish wedding breakfast.