Hannibal


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Han·ni·bal 1

 (hăn′ə-bəl) 247-183? bc.
Carthaginian general who crossed the Alps in 218 with about 35,000 men and routed Roman armies at Lake Trasimeno (217) and Cannae (216). He was later defeated at the Battle of Zama (202).

Han·ni·bal 2

 (hăn′ə-bəl)
A city of northeast Missouri on the Mississippi River northwest of St. Louis. It is famous as the boyhood home of Mark Twain.

Hannibal

(ˈhænɪbəl)
n
(Biography) 247–182 bc, Carthaginian general; son of Hamilcar Barca. He commanded the Carthaginian army in the Second Punic War (218–201). After capturing Sagunto in Spain, he invaded Italy (218), crossing the Alps with an army of about 40 000 men and defeating the Romans at Trasimene (217) and Cannae (216). In 203 he was recalled to defend Carthage and was defeated by Scipio at Zama (202). He was later forced into exile and committed suicide to avoid capture

Han•ni•bal

(ˈhæn ə bəl)

n.
1. 247–183 B.C., Carthaginian general who crossed the Alps and invaded Italy (son of Hamilcar Barca).
2. a port in NE Missouri, on the Mississippi: Mark Twain's boyhood home. 18,811.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hannibal - general who commanded the Carthaginian army in the second Punic WarHannibal - general who commanded the Carthaginian army in the second Punic War; crossed the Alps and defeated the Romans but was recalled to defend Carthage and was defeated (247-182 BC)
2.Hannibal - a town in northeast Missouri on the Mississippi River; boyhood home of Mark Twain
Missouri, Show Me State, MO - a midwestern state in central United States; a border state during the American Civil War, Missouri was admitted to the Confederacy without actually seceding from the Union
Translations

Hannibal

[ˈhænɪbəl] NAníbal

Hannibal

[ˈhænɪbl] nAnnibale m
References in classic literature ?
"But old Hannibal's getting cranky," Collins objected.
Among the wonderful deeds of Hannibal this one is enumerated: that having led an enormous army, composed of many various races of men, to fight in foreign lands, no dissensions arose either among them or against the prince, whether in his bad or in his good fortune.
And there seems no reason to doubt that if these elephants, which have now been hunted for thousands of years, by Semiramis, by Porus, by hannibal, and by all the successive monarchs of the East --if they still survive there in great numbers, much more may the great whale outlast all hunting, since he has a pasture to expatiate in, which is precisely twice as large as all Asia, both Americas, Europe and Africa, New Holland, and all the Isles of the sea combined.
Next, I saw Hannibal passing the Alps, who told me "he had not a drop of vinegar in his camp."
Lake Thracymene, illumined by the evening sun, lay like flaming gold between the dark-blue mountain-ridges; here, where Hannibal defeated Flaminius, the rivers now held each other in their green embraces; lovely, half-naked children tended a herd of black swine, beneath a group of fragrant laurel-trees, hard by the road-side.
Lusitania had a Viriatus, Rome a Caesar, Carthage a Hannibal, Greece an Alexander, Castile a Count Fernan Gonzalez, Valencia a Cid, Andalusia a Gonzalo Fernandez, Estremadura a Diego Garcia de Paredes, Jerez a Garci Perez de Vargas, Toledo a Garcilaso, Seville a Don Manuel de Leon, to read of whose valiant deeds will entertain and instruct the loftiest minds and fill them with delight and wonder.
Hannibal had carried her arms into the heart of Italy and to the gates of Rome, before Scipio, in turn, gave him an overthrow in the territories of Carthage, and made a conquest of the commonwealth.
I was being hailed as one of a nation who possess military genius which had not been equalled since the days of Hannibal and Caesar.
"It was well played, chevalier, that is all, and no more is to be said about it: you are a soldier, both brave and cunning, which proves that you unite the qualities of Fabius and Hannibal. You employed your means, force and cunning: there is nothing to be said against that: I ought to have been on guard."
The first books he read out of school were a Life of Hannibal, the great Carthagenian general, and a Life of Wallace, the great Scottish hero; this last being lent him by the blacksmith.
Besides, remember that Alexander was lame and Hannibal had but one eye."
Caesar, and Hannibal, and Alexander, and Napoleon are all on his staff, and ever so many more great generals; but the public hardly care to look at THEM when HE is around.