harakeke


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harakeke

(hɑːrəˈkiːkiː)
n
(Plants) NZ another name for flax4
[Māori]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
The harakeke represents the land and the unity of different iwi.
They were given a suitable daytime roost cavity made from harakeke (Phormium tenax) flower stalk, and were fed palatable leaves from at least three native plant species each week and 80% soy protein pellets (Griffin et al.
Pickering, "The potential of harakeke fibre as reinforcement in polymer matrix composites including modelling of long harakeke fibre composite strength," Composites Part A: Applied Science and Manufacturing, vol.
The whanau contribution plays an important role in overall well-being for Maori and is often described through the use of the Harakeke (Flax) metaphor.
The speaker then turns to the immediate family and once again include in his speech of comfort, wise sayings of the ancestors, for example, if the children are already adults, he may refer to the saying "Kua tipu te pa harakeke (the flax bush has matured)".
Culturally-situated activities, or everyday occupations, such as kapa haka and mahi harakeke (Flax weaving), have been explored in terms of connecting with one's spirituality (Bright, 2010; Ihimaera, 2004) or from socio-cultural perspectives (Smith, 2003; Wirihana, 2008).
Tungia te ururua, kia tupu whakaritorito te tupu o te harakeke: A critical analysis of parents as first teachers.