Harlem Renaissance


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Noun1.Harlem Renaissance - a period in the 1920s when African-American achievements in art and music and literature flourished
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This study investigates the absence of sports in most of the literature of the Harlem Renaissance and in critical studies of the popular culture of the era, exploring writers like W.E.B.
The Harlem Renaissance and the Idea of a New Negro Reader.
Eric Derwent Walrond (December 18, 1898-August 8, 1966) was an Afro-Caribbean Harlem Renaissance writer and journalist, who made a lasting contribution to literature; his work remains in print today as a classic of its era.
The Harlem Renaissance of the early 20th century was one of the richest and most revolutionary periods in American arts, laying down a foundation for a great deal of what would follow in American music, poetry and other art forms.
The Collage Aesthetic in the Harlem Renaissance. Farnham, UK: Ashgate, 2009.
The Harlem Renaissance revisited; politics, arts, and letters.
Western Echoes of the Harlem Renaissance: The Life and Writings of Anita Scott Coleman reveals Coleman's life and rise as Afro-American writer living not in New York but mostly in the Southwest and West.
THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE (2008; $49), by Kevin Hillstrom.
THAT MANY OR MOST of the prominent figures of the Harlem Renaissance were gay or bisexual has become such a commonplace that Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
Aaron Douglas, who combined angular Cubist rhythms and seductive Art Deco dynamism with traditional African and Black imagery, has long been known for his contributions to the Harlem Renaissance and American modernism in general.
Myers captures the mood of the Harlem Renaissance with an amusing story line, lively dialogue and guest appearances of many key figures of the era, such as Jessie Faucet, Langston Hughes and W.
On the Shoulders of Giants: My Journey through the Harlem Renaissance. Simon and Schuster, 2007.