harmonic

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harmonic
Visual representation of harmonics in the periodic motion of a vibrating guitar string. First (or fundamental) harmonic (top), second harmonic (center), and sixth harmonic (bottom).

har·mon·ic

 (här-mŏn′ĭk)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to harmony.
b. Pleasing to the ear: harmonic orchestral effects.
c. Characterized by harmony: a harmonic liturgical chant.
2. Of or relating to harmonics.
3. Integrated in nature.
n.
1.
a. Any of a series of musical tones whose frequencies are integral multiples of the frequency of a fundamental tone.
b. A tone produced on a stringed instrument by lightly touching an open or stopped vibrating string at a given fraction of its length so that both segments vibrate. Also called overtone, partial, partial tone.
2. harmonics(used with a sing. verb) The theory or study of the physical properties and characteristics of musical sound.
3. Physics Any of a series of periodic waves whose frequencies are integral multiples of a fundamental frequency.

[Latin harmonicus, from Greek harmonikos, from harmoniā, harmony; see harmony.]

har·mon′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

harmonic

(hɑːˈmɒnɪk)
adj
1. of, involving, producing, or characterized by harmony; harmonious
2. (Music, other) music of, relating to, or belonging to harmony
3. (Mathematics) maths
a. capable of expression in the form of sine and cosine functions
b. of or relating to numbers whose reciprocals form an arithmetic progression
4. (General Physics) physics of or concerned with an oscillation that has a frequency that is an integral multiple of a fundamental frequency
5. (General Physics) physics of or concerned with harmonics
n
6. (Music, other) physics music a component of a periodic quantity, such as a musical tone, with a frequency that is an integral multiple of the fundamental frequency. The first harmonic is the fundamental, the second harmonic (twice the fundamental frequency) is the first overtone, the third harmonic (three times the fundamental frequency) is the second overtone, etc
7. (General Physics) physics music a component of a periodic quantity, such as a musical tone, with a frequency that is an integral multiple of the fundamental frequency. The first harmonic is the fundamental, the second harmonic (twice the fundamental frequency) is the first overtone, the third harmonic (three times the fundamental frequency) is the second overtone, etc
8. (Music, other) music (not in technical use) overtone: in this case, the first overtone is the first harmonic, etc
[C16: from Latin harmonicus relating to harmony]
harˈmonically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

har•mon•ic

(hɑrˈmɒn ɪk)

adj.
1. pertaining to harmony, as distinguished from melody and rhythm.
2. marked by harmony; in harmony; concordant; consonant.
3. of, pertaining to, or noting a series of oscillations in which each oscillation has a frequency that is an integral multiple of the same basic frequency.
4. Math.
a. (of a set of values) related in a manner analogous to the frequencies of tones that are consonant.
b. capable of being represented by sine and cosine functions.
n.
6. a single oscillation whose frequency is an integral multiple of the fundamental frequency.
[1560–70; < Latin harmonicus < Greek harmonikós musical, suitable. See harmony, -ic]
har•mon′i•cal•ly, adv.
har•mon′i•cal•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.harmonic - a tone that is a component of a complex sound
pure tone, tone - a steady sound without overtones; "they tested his hearing with pure tones of different frequencies"
first harmonic, fundamental frequency, fundamental - the lowest tone of a harmonic series
partial tone, overtone, partial - a harmonic with a frequency that is a multiple of the fundamental frequency
2.harmonic - any of a series of musical tones whose frequencies are integral multiples of the frequency of a fundamental
timbre, tone, quality, timber - (music) the distinctive property of a complex sound (a voice or noise or musical sound); "the timbre of her soprano was rich and lovely"; "the muffled tones of the broken bell summoned them to meet"
Adj.1.harmonic - of or relating to harmony as distinct from melody and rhythm; "subtleties of harmonic change and tonality"- Ralph Hill
nonharmonic - not harmonic; "a nonharmonic note"
2.harmonic - of or relating to harmonics
3.harmonic - of or relating to the branch of acoustics that studies the composition of musical sounds; "the sound of the resonating cavity cannot be the only determinant of the harmonic response"
4.harmonic - relating to vibrations that occur as a result of vibrations in a nearby body; "sympathetic vibration"
harmonious - musically pleasing
5.harmonic - involving or characterized by harmony
harmonious - musically pleasing
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

harmonic

adjective
Characterized by harmony of sound:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
تَوافُقي النَّغَم ، مُؤْتَلِف
harmonický
harmonisk
ahenkli

harmonic

[hɑːˈmɒnɪk] ADJarmónico
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

harmonic

[hɑːrˈmɒnɪk] adjharmonique
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

harmonic

n (Mus) → Oberton m
adj (Mus, Phys) → harmonisch
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

harmonic

[hɑːˈmɒnɪk] adjarmonico/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

harmony

(ˈhaːməni) plural ˈharmonies noun
1. (of musical sounds, colours etc) (the state of forming) a pleasing combination. The singers sang in harmony.
2. the agreement of people's feelings, opinions etc. Few married couples live in perfect harmony.
harˈmonic (-ˈmo-) adjective
of, or concerned with, especially musical harmony.
harˈmonious (-ˈməu-) adjective
1. pleasant-sounding. a harmonious melody.
2. pleasant to the eye. a harmonious colour scheme.
3. without disagreement or bad feeling. a harmonious relationship.
harˈmoniously adverb
harˈmoniousness noun
ˈharmonize, ˈharmonise verb
1. to sing or play musical instruments in harmony.
2. to add different parts to (a melody) to form harmonies.
3. to (cause to) be in harmony or agreement. The colours in this room harmonize nicely.
harmoniˈzation, harmoniˈsation noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 1 shows that the second formant frequency for both the vowels /i/ and /e/ is slightly above the fourth harmonic frequency (4[f.sub.o]), suggesting that the [F.sub.2] resonance could give a major boost to this fourth harmonic.
In order to eliminate the contribution of the second harmonic frequency due to alternating Lorentz force, the loading of body force is just applied by static Lorentz force [b.sub.L,S] in numerical model.
In addition, the phase shift is still 0 at every positive and negative sequence harmonic frequency, which indicates that the digital control delay has less influence on the system and the current loop still has high static control accuracy.
Harmonic spectrum for each load is plotted showing magnitude of each harmonic frequency that makes up a distorted waveform.
Passive filters attenuate specific harmonic frequency at the system dependent.
The maximum of the signal is calculated for all candidate vectors for time range from 0 to 0.6s which corresponds to common (fundamental) harmonic frequency of sinusoidal waveforms (in our case 1/1.667=0.6s)
(2) Regardless of the harmonic current flows or not, all of the harmonic current to increase the loss in transformer windings and core, causing additional loss and increases the winding temperature and higher harmonic frequency injection transformer will produce set of skin effect and proximity effect, increase the additional copper loss and iron loss, fever, amounting to less than the rated power.
The second peak occurs at the critical band 16, which is contributed by responses at the second gear mesh harmonic frequency of 3280 Hz.
With this, however, comes the consideration that the blowers must be kept from operating at their harmonic frequency of rotation.
Distortion is that the fundamental frequency sine wave is represented as super position of all harmonic frequency sine waves on fundamental sine wave.
Dealing with the transmitting mode, the pulse splitting technique may also be exploited to synthesize a beam pattern at the harmonic frequency properly selected on the basis of the requirements arising from a working environment shared with other systems in order to transmit a signal on a free "channel" avoiding interferences.