Harold


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Har•old

(ˈhær əld)
n.
1. Harold I ( “Harefoot” ), died 1040, king of England 1035–40 (son of Canute).
2. Harold II, 1022?–66, king of England 1066: defeated at Hastings (son of Earl Godwin).
Translations
Harald
Harald
Harald
References in classic literature ?
When it began to be talked about that Georgina should be taken abroad, mamma wrote to me that I had better stop in Paris for a month with Harold, so that she could pick me up on their way to Hyeres.
Her whole life was a round of devotion and of love, which was divided between her husband and her only son, Harold.
``Yes,'' said Cedric, half speaking to himself, and half addressing himself to Athelstane, ``it was in this very hall that my father feasted with Torquil Wolfganger, when he entertained the valiant and unfortunate Harold, then advancing against the Norwegians, who had united themselves to the rebel Tosti.
But it was not until Byron published his first long poem, called Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, that he became famous.
His poetical vein was really exhausted when in 1812 and 1813 Byron's 'Childe Harold' and flashy Eastern tales captured the public fancy.
HAROLD } Footmen LADY CHILTERN LADY MARKBY THE COUNTESS OF BASILDON MRS.
He was there because, three weeks before, Harold Flower had called him a vegetable.
"'Have you the slate, Harold?' cried the older man, as this strange being fell rather than sat down into a chair.
Lieutenant Harold Percy Smith-Oldwick, Royal Air Service, was on reconnaissance.
The Spencerian stanza, with its rich variety of movement and its harmonious closes, long shut "Childe Harold" from me, and whenever I found a poem in any book which did not rhyme its second line with its first I read it unwillingly or not at all.
'I bet there's a story in there of a man named Harold who was too proud to marry a girl, though he loved her, because she was rich and he wasn't.
We must pay a visit to Harold Skimpole and caution him on these points.