Hardicanute

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Related to Harthacnut: Hardicanute, Canute III

Har·di·ca·nute

 (här′dĭ-kə-no͞ot′, -nyo͞ot′) also Har·tha·ca·nut or Har·tha·cnut (här′thə-) 1018-1042.
King of England (1040-1042) and of Denmark (1035-1042). The legitimate son of King Canute, he claimed the English throne after the death of Harold I, Canute's illegitimate son.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Hardicanute

(ˈhɑːdɪkəˌnjuːt)
n
(Biography) same as Harthacanute
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
In 1041 the residents of Worcester objected to Danegeld being raised by Viking king Harthacnut and killed two tax collectors.
Harthacnut burned down Worcester, which was silly because he destroyed his source of revenue.
Shortly after his accession to the English throne in 1040, the new king Harthacnut ordered the body of his predecessor and half-brother, Harold Harefoot, to be removed from its resting place at Westminster and thrown into a swamp.
Harthacnuts deliberate attempt to mark his half-brother's corpse as a 'deviant body' (p.
"Hardly capable" would, in fact, have made an appropriate name, but in reality they were called Hardicanute (or Harthacnut) and Harold Harefoot, half-brothers, in fact.
When Harold was chosen king in 1035, Harthacnut was away, sorting out his Danish kingdom.
Even that turned out to be unnecessary, for Harold died unexpectedly in 1040, and Harthacnut returned peacefully to Kent to claim the throne.
His position secure, Harthacnut could now begin to make himself unpopular with the whole of his kingdom, instead of just half of it.
As a leading city in the earldom of Mercia, Worcester was probably no enthusiastic supporter of Harthacnut anyway.
The English throne passed briefly to his son Harthacnut. 1660: John Bunyan, author of The Pilgrim's Progress, was jailed for preaching without a licence.
Indeed in the 11th century, under Cnut and Harthacnut, England was ruled as part of the Danish Empire.
also Harthacnut's harrying of the tax rebels in Worcester in 1041, Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, recensions C and D, in English Historical Documents, i, c.500-1042 (ed.