Harvard


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Har·vard

 (här′vərd), John 1607-1638.
English-born American cleric and philanthropist who left his library and half his estate to the college in Cambridge, Massachusetts, that now bears his name.

Har•vard

(ˈhɑr vərd)

n.
John, 1607–38, English clergyman in the U.S.: benefactor of Harvard College.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Harvard - a university in Massachusetts
Ivy League - a league of universities and colleges in the northeastern United States that have a reputation for scholastic achievement and social prestige
Cambridge - a city in Massachusetts just to the north of Boston; site of Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
2.Harvard - American philanthropist who left his library and half his estate to the Massachusetts college that now bears his name (1607-1638)Harvard - American philanthropist who left his library and half his estate to the Massachusetts college that now bears his name (1607-1638)
References in classic literature ?
FROM LOUIS LEVERETT, IN PARIS, TO HARVARD TREMONT, IN BOSTON.
Individuals had come from the rich establishment at Lebanon, from Canterbury, Harvard, and Alfred, and from all the other localities where this strange people have fertilized the rugged hills of New England by their systematic industry.
But there is reason to believe that President Dunster sat in it, when he held the first Commencement at Harvard College.
Philip could not help seeing that Hayward looked a perfect fool, and Hayward had not the sense to hold his tongue; in his irritation, his self-assurance undaunted, he attempted to argue: he made wild statements and Weeks amicably corrected them; he reasoned falsely and Weeks proved that he was absurd: Weeks confessed that he had taught Greek Literature at Harvard.
Like a mob of young collegians, they are full of fight, fun, and wickedness, tumbling round the world at such a reckless, rollicking rate, that no prudent underwriter would insure them any more than he would a riotous lad at Yale or Harvard.
Before the first of June, Gaston Cleric was offered an instructorship at Harvard College, and accepted it.
in my desk, then here I prospectively ascribe all the honor and the glory to whaling; for a whale-ship was my Yale College and my Harvard.
They had had lunch together, and Aynesworth had taken a fancy to the boy--he was little more--fresh from Harvard and full of enthusiasm.
Once only, just after Harvard, he had spent a few gay weeks at Florence with a band of queer Europeanised Americans, dancing all night with titled ladies in palaces, and gambling half the day with the rakes and dandies of the fashionable club; but it had all seemed to him, though the greatest fun in the world, as unreal as a carnival.
then here I prospectively ascribe all the honour and the glory to whaling; for a whale-ship was my Yale College and my Harvard.
The sweeping of that room was my college examination, and never did any youth pass an examination for entrance into Harvard or Yale that gave him more genuine satisfaction.
in his address at Harvard Commencement: "We all know that, as things actually are, many of the most influential and most highly remunerated members of the Bar in every centre of wealth, make it their special task to work out bold and ingenious schemes by which their wealthy clients, individual or corporate, can evade the laws which were made to regulate, in the interests of the public, the uses of great wealth.