Hashimoto's thyroiditis

(redirected from Hashimoto Disease)
Also found in: Medical.
Related to Hashimoto Disease: Graves disease, hypothyroidism

Hashimoto's thyroiditis

An autoimmune disorder in which the cells of the thyroid gland are attacked. This interferes with the production of hormones by the thyroid gland, causing fatigue and weight gain.
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Torsten Matthias (Expert on Celiac Disease, Hashimoto Disease and Autoimmunity)
Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease): MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia.
Skahen, "Relation of thyroid neoplasms to Hashimoto disease of the thyroid gland," Archives of Surgery, vol.
[76.] Dailey ME, Lindsay S, Skahen R (1955) Relation of thyroid neoplasms to Hashimoto disease of the thyroid gland.
The diagnosis of Hashimoto disease was confirmed by thyroid gland biopsy.
The average content of selenium in serum of patients with Hashimoto disease with skin changes (64.998 [+ or -] 16.93 [micro]g/L; n=123) was significantly higher (p<0.0007) than in patients without skin lesion (50.776 [+ or -] 14.72 [micro]g/L; n=120).
(7) The variety of disorders ranges from congenital hypothyroidism to autoimmune thyroiditis, including both Graves and Hashimoto disease. (7,15) Hashimoto thyroiditis, or chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis, as seen in the current case, however, is by the far the most common acquired thyroid disorder in DS and typically causes hypothyroidism with or without detectable serum anti-thyroid antibodies at a median age of onset of 12.3 years and with an equal distribution in both male and female DS individuals.
In a large-scale study demonstrating the association of autoimmune diseases, 1419 children with type 1 DM were investigated to determine the frequency of Hashimoto disease and a significantly higher frequency of thyroitidis was found compared to the normal population (3.9% compared to the frequency of 1.2% in the normal population in USA) (10).
He then discusses thyroid nodules, covering follicular neoplasms and nodules in Graves and Hashimoto disease. Finally, he addresses the management of malignant tumors, discussing principles of classification, treatment strategies and controversies, and results.
The severity of Hashimoto disease (HD) varies among patients and is difficult to predict when the disease is in the subclinical state and diagnosed by the presence of thyroid-specific autoantibody.