hate speech

(redirected from Hate-speech)

hate speech

n.
Bigoted speech attacking or disparaging a social group or a member of such a group.

hate speech

n
(Sociology) speech disparaging a racial, sexual, or ethnic group or a member of such a group

hate′ speech`


n.
speech that attacks a person or group on the basis of race, religion, gender, or sexual orientation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Sri Lankan government believes Facebook is responsible for fuelling anti-Muslim riots in the country, and has banned the network until it agrees to block hate-speech more quickly.
Weinstein argues that hate-speech bans function analogously to undermine the legitimacy of particular laws whose subject matter is related to hate speech, like laws prohibiting discrimination or determining immigration quotas.
Canada and the EU possess so-called hate-speech laws, whereas the US does not yet possess such laws, though it is clearly heading in that direction, as noted by Robert Spencer: "We already have hate crimes in the United States.
In fact more hate-speech and incitement have been coming out from members of the Israeli government, more settler attacks have been carried and more Palestinians have been killed, injured and/or detained, he said, voicing disappointment over the fact that over a month has passed without the Israeli government bringing the terrorists to justice.
The UN also blasted Germany, which has some of the strictest hate-speech laws in the world, for failing to prosecute a politician who criticized massive immigration into the nation.
All western European countries have hate-speech laws.
According to Gwen Landolt of REAL Women of Canada, the wording of the French legislation resembles the Canadian hate-speech bill C-250 passed in February 2004.
Indeed, hate-speech censors could very well concede that bigoted expression "implicates" the First Amendment but argue that it is "so harmful that we are justified in restraining it.
But then they go on to give this new tool to the power structure-the open-ended power to punish or suppress words that may be subordinating or degrading to women, or hate-speech.
And if this doesn't follow for Q in the relatively formalized context of voting, how can it possibly be true of the slight impact that hate-speech laws have on the manner of P's expression in a diffuse free-wheeling debate?
While it begins with Twain, it passes through a house of First Amendment horrors that now stretches coast to coast: hate-speech ordinances, speech codes on campus, flag-burning amendments to the U.
Invoking Percy Bysshe Shelley's argument about the impossibility of translating poetry, Post argues there are "ideas which can be expressed only in the particular outrageous style that hate-speech regulations proscribe," Post, supra note 3, at 656.