Hatshepsut


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Hat·shep·sut

 (hăt-shĕp′so͞ot′) also Hat·shep·set (-sĕt′) Died c. 1482 bc.
Queen of Egypt (1502-1482) who on the death of her husband, Thutmose II (c. 1504), became regent for her stepson Thutmose III. She bestowed the title of pharaoh on herself and adopted all the pharaonic customs, including the wearing of a false beard.

Hatshepsut

(hætˈʃɛpsuːt) or

Hatshepset

n
(Biography) queen of Egypt of the l8th dynasty (?1512–1482 bc). She built a great mortuary temple at Deir el Bahri near Thebes

Hat•shep•sut

(hætˈʃɛp sut)

also Hat•shep•set

(-sɛt)

n.
queen of Egypt c1503–c1482 b.c.
References in periodicals archive ?
This new finding further supports Reeves's assumption that other queens from the 18 th dynasty, such as Hatshepsut, had similar tombs.
This form of statue, in which an image of the donor holds an "emblem of a goddess," often a sistrum, first appears in the early years of Hatshepsut, when she was still acting as coregent to Thutmose III.
The other finds include a sphinx-shaped statue and another relief showing two obelisks being transported which experts say could date to the time of 18th dynasty Queen Hatshepsut.
Records indicate that Hatshepsut was a successful leader; she oversaw a period of prolific construction.
Leaving from Luxor, Royal Viking will sail to Aswan with visits to the Valley of the Kings, the Temple of Hatshepsut, the Valley of the Queens and the Temple of Karnak in Luxor.
The Temples of Hatshepsut, above, and Edfu, below, are just two of the fantastic sights on this six-day Nile cruise on the Royal Viking
The Temples of Edfu, above, and Hatshepsut, right, are just two of the fantastic sights on this six-day Nile cruise on the Royal Viking The Temples of Edfu, above, and Hatshepsut, right, are just two of the fantastic sights on this six-day Nile cruise on the Royal Viking SSITTING on deck under the warm afternoon sun, the quiet of the Nile is interrupted only by the occasional braying of a donkey and enthusiastic greeting of children as we pass.
The exact time is indeterminate, as words such as transsexual and transgender are both of twentieth century vintage, and yet ancient Pharaoh Hatshepsut, ruling nearly thirty-five centuries ago, "had herself depicted solely as a male king, in the pharaohs headdress, the pharaoh's shencip kilt, and the pharaoh's false beard--without any female traits" [emphasis original] (Brown, 2009).
He also discusses the few queens who ruled as kings, notably, Hatshepsut and Cleopatra.
I remember that back in 1997, some friends and I attended the opening of Opera Aida in Luxor and only a few days later, Al-Gama'a attacked tourists in the temple of Hatshepsut, killing 62 tourists, soldiers, and locals.