Hawks


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hawk 1

 (hôk)
n.
1. Any of various birds of prey, especially of the genera Accipiter and Buteo in the family Accipitridae, characteristically having a short hooked bill and strong claws used for seizing.
2. Any of various similar birds of prey.
3. A person who preys on others; a shark.
4.
a. One who demonstrates an actively aggressive or combative attitude, as in an argument.
b. A person who favors military force or action in order to carry out foreign policy.
intr.v. hawked, hawk·ing, hawks
1. To hunt with trained hawks.
2. To swoop and strike in the manner of a hawk: "It was fun to watch the scattered snail kites ... lifting and falling in the wind as they hawked across the shining grass and water" (Peter Matthiessen).

[Middle English hauk, from Old English hafoc; see kap- in Indo-European roots.]

hawk′ish adj.
hawk′ish·ly adv.
hawk′ish·ness n.

hawk 2

 (hôk)
v. hawked, hawk·ing, hawks
v.intr.
To peddle goods aggressively, especially by calling out.
v.tr.
To peddle (goods) aggressively, especially by calling out.

[Middle English hauken, back-formation from hauker; see hawker.]

hawk 3

 (hôk)
v. hawked, hawk·ing, hawks
v.intr.
To clear or attempt to clear the throat by or as if by coughing up phlegm.
v.tr.
To clear the throat of (phlegm).
n.
An audible effort to clear the throat by expelling phlegm.

[Imitative.]

Hawks

 (hôks), Howard Winchester 1896-1977.
American filmmaker whose works include His Girl Friday (1940) and Red River (1948).

Hawks

(hɔːks)
n
(Biography) Howard (Winchester). 1896–1977, US film director. His films include Sergeant York (1941) and The Big Sleep (1946)
References in classic literature ?
The light air about me told me that the world ended here: only the ground and sun and sky were left, and if one went a little farther there would be only sun and sky, and one would float off into them, like the tawny hawks which sailed over our heads making slow shadows on the grass.
A little girl who lived on the Black Hawk road was bitten on the ankle and had been sick all summer.
A NIGHTINGALE, sitting aloft upon an oak and singing according to his wont, was seen by a Hawk who, being in need of food, swooped down and seized him.
There was once upon a time a witch, who in the shape of a hawk used every night to break the windows of a certain village church.
He saw the hawk swooping down upon the church, and in a moment he had seized his gun and shot at the bird.
He never forgot the hawk, and its moving shadow always sent him crouching into the nearest thicket.
So he sat on his haunches, conspicuously in an open space, and challenged the hawk down out of the sky.
Nor me, Nickleby,' cried a gentleman with a flushed face and a flash air, from the elbow of Sir Mulberry Hawk.
Nickleby,' said Sir Mulberry Hawk, in a thick coarse voice, 'take the hint, and tack it on the other five-and-twenty, or whatever it is, and give me half for the advice.
The recent hoverings of the Blackfeet about the camp, their nightly prowls and daring and successful marauds, had kept him in a fever and a flutter, like a hawk in a cage who hears his late companions swooping and screaming in wild liberty above him.
But already the sable wing was before the old man's eyes; the long hooked bill at his head: with a scream, the black hawk darted away with his prize.
On her left hand she bore a hawk, a proof to Don Quixote's mind that she must be some great lady and the mistress of the whole hunting party, which was the fact; so he said to Sancho, "Run Sancho, my son, and say to that lady on the palfrey with the hawk that I, the Knight of the Lions, kiss the hands of her exalted beauty, and if her excellence will grant me leave I will go and kiss them in person and place myself at her service for aught that may be in my power and her highness may command; and mind, Sancho, how thou speakest, and take care not to thrust in any of thy proverbs into thy message.