Hawthorne effect

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Related to Hawthorne experiments: Hawthorne studies

Hawthorne effect

(ˈhɔːˌθɔːn)
n
(Sociology) improvement in the performance of employees, students, etc, brought about by making changes in working methods, resulting from research into means of improving performance. Compare iatrogenic, placebo effect
[from the Western Electric Company's Hawthorne works in Chicago, USA, where it was discovered during experiments in the 1920s]
References in periodicals archive ?
In an echo of the Hawthorne experiments, patients bonded with their non-physician case workers and appreciated that they could by-pass normal procedures when they had medical problems.
In particular, the Hawthorne experiments of Elton Mayo underwrite this book's thesis.
scientific defeat transformed into victory by a leap of insight has played a major role in investing the Hawthorne experiments with their mythic power' (p.
The focus on a worker's individuality is not a new concept, since the Hawthorne experiments by Elton Mayo in the 1920s opened the door to this venue in organizational studies.
The Hawthorne Experiments began in 1924, Mayo's involvement in them in 1928, after he had moved to the Harvard University School of Business Administration as Associate Professor of Industrial Research.