dormouse

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Related to Hazel Dormouse: Gliridae

dor·mouse

 (dôr′mous′)
n. pl. dor·mice (-mīs′)
Any of various small omnivorous rodents of the family Gliridae of Eurasia and Africa, having long furred tails and known for their long hibernation periods.

[Middle English, perhaps alteration (influenced by mous, mouse) of Anglo-Norman *dormeus, inclined to sleep, hibernating, from Old French dormir, to sleep; see dormant.]

dormouse

(ˈdɔːˌmaʊs)
n, pl -mice
(Animals) any small Old World rodent of the family Gliridae, esp the Eurasian Muscardinus avellanarius, resembling a mouse with a furry tail
[C15: dor-, perhaps from Old French dormir to sleep, from Latin dormīre + mouse]

dor•mouse

(ˈdɔrˌmaʊs)

n., pl. -mice (-ˌmaɪs)
any small usu. bushy-tailed Old World climbing rodent of the family Gliridae.
[1400–50; late Middle English dormowse, dormoise, perhaps Anglo-French derivative of Old French dormir to sleep (see dormant), with final syllable reanalyzed as mouse]

dormouse

- A rodent but not a mouse, it may be a corrupted form of French dormeus, "sleepy."
See also related terms for mice.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dormouse - small furry-tailed squirrel-like Old World rodent that becomes torpid in cold weatherdormouse - small furry-tailed squirrel-like Old World rodent that becomes torpid in cold weather
gnawer, rodent - relatively small placental mammals having a single pair of constantly growing incisor teeth specialized for gnawing
family Gliridae, Gliridae - dormice and other Old World forms
Glis glis, loir - large European dormouse
hazel mouse, Muscardinus avellanarius - a variety of dormouse
lerot - dormouse of southern Europe and northern Africa
Translations

dormouse

[ˈdɔːmaʊs] N (dormice (pl)) → lirón m

dormouse

[ˈdɔːrmaʊs] [dormice] [ˈdɔːrmaɪs] (pl) nloir m

dormouse

n pl <dormice> → Haselmaus f; edible or fat dormouseSiebenschläfer m; common dormouseGemeiner Siebenschläfer

dormouse

[ˈdɔːˌmaʊs] n (dormice (pl)) [ˈdɔːˌmaɪs]ghiro
References in periodicals archive ?
Dominated by mature Sessile oak and ash and featuring an understorey of coppiced hazel and climbing honeysuckle, Strawberry Cottage Wood is perfect habitat for the elusive hazel dormouse.
The reintroduction is part of the efforts to boost the fortunes of the hazel dormouse, immortalised as a sleepy guest at the Mad Hatter's Tea Party in Alice in Wonderland.
HAZEL dormouse numbers have fallen by more than a third since the turn of the century, a new report warns.
Big fall in dormouse population HAZEL dormouse numbers have fallen by more than a third since the turn of the century, a new report warns.
Woodland in Caerphilly is well known for its wildlife which includes a number of species of reptiles, birds and even endangered mammals like the hazel dormouse.
The small band of conservationists began looking for the hazel dormouse after half-eaten nuts suggested their presence.
THE public is being urged to search their local woods for hazelnuts with the tell-tale sign they have been nibbled by a hazel dormouse as part of a survey to determine where the rare mammal can be found.
LOTTERY money will help protect the rare hazel dormouse in North Wales.
London, Dec 28 (ANI): The hedgehog, water vole and hazel dormouse are among a number of British mammals that face extinction, according to a new research.
Dormice are an endangered species in the North East, although our region plays host to the most northerly population of the Hazel Dormouse in the UK.
The hazel dormouse was found in a Devon forest and chosen to restore his breed's fortunes by spending the next five years mating in captivity.
The only resident dormouse species, the hazel dormouse (Muscardinus avellanarius) most likely arrived at this northern frontier some 11000 years ago along with the deciduous forest, which for several thousand years covered Denmark until agriculture arrived 5000 years later.