headland

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Related to Headlands: Headlands Beach State Park

head·land

 (hĕd′lənd, -lănd′)
n.
1. A point of land, usually high and with a sheer drop, extending out into a body of water; a promontory.
2. The unplowed land at the end of a plowed furrow.

headland

n
1. (Physical Geography) a narrow area of land jutting out into a sea, lake, etc
2. (Agriculture) a strip of land along the edge of an arable field left unploughed to allow space for machines

head•land

(ˈhɛd lənd)

n.
1. a promontory extending into a large body of water.
2. a strip of unplowed land at the ends of furrows or near a fence or border.
[before 1000]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.headland - a natural elevation (especially a rocky one that juts out into the sea)headland - a natural elevation (especially a rocky one that juts out into the sea)
mull - a term used in Scottish names of promontories; "the Mull of Kintyre"
natural elevation, elevation - a raised or elevated geological formation
point - a promontory extending out into a large body of water; "they sailed south around the point"

headland

noun promontory, point, head, cape, cliff, bluff, mull (Scot.), foreland, bill The headland south of Coolum has walking trails.
Translations
لِسان من الأرض داخِل البَحْر
mysostroh
forbjerg
kabo
niemipäistepiennar
elõhegység
höfîi; allhátt nes

headland

[ˈhedlənd] Ncabo m, punta f

headland

[ˈhɛdlænd ˈhɛdlənd] npromontoire m, cap m

headland

[ˈhɛdlənd] npunta, promontorio

head

(hed) noun
1. the top part of the human body, containing the eyes, mouth, brain etc; the same part of an animal's body. The stone hit him on the head; He scratched his head in amazement.
2. a person's mind. An idea came into my head last night.
3. the height or length of a head. The horse won by a head.
4. the chief or most important person (of an organization, country etc). Kings and presidents are heads of state; (also adjective) a head waiter; the head office.
5. anything that is like a head in shape or position. the head of a pin; The boy knocked the heads off the flowers.
6. the place where a river, lake etc begins. the head of the Nile.
7. the top, or the top part, of anything. Write your address at the head of the paper; the head of the table.
8. the front part. He walked at the head of the procession.
9. a particular ability or tolerance. He has no head for heights; She has a good head for figures.
10. a headmaster or headmistress. You'd better ask the Head.
11. (for) one person. This dinner costs $10 a head.
12. a headland. Beachy Head.
13. the foam on the top of a glass of beer etc.
verb
1. to go at the front of or at the top of (something). The procession was headed by the band; Whose name headed the list?
2. to be in charge of; to be the leader of. He heads a team of scientists investigating cancer.
3. (often with for) to (cause to) move in a certain direction. The explorers headed south; The boys headed for home; You're heading for disaster!
4. to put or write something at the beginning of. His report was headed `Ways of Preventing Industrial Accidents'.
5. (in football) to hit the ball with the head. He headed the ball into the goal.
-headed
having (a certain number or type of) head(s). a two-headed monster; a bald-headed man.
ˈheader noun
1. a fall or dive forwards. He slipped and took a header into the mud.
2. (in football) the act of hitting the ball with the head. He scored with a great header.
ˈheading noun
what is written at the top of a page etc. The teacher said that essays must have a proper heading.
heads noun, adverb
(on) the side of a coin with the head of a king, president etc on it. He tossed the penny and it came down heads.
ˈheadache noun
1. a pain in the head. Bright lights give me a headache.
2. something worrying. Lack of money is a real headache.
ˈheadband noun
a strip of material worn round the head to keep one's hair off one's face.
ˈhead-dress noun
something, usually ornamental, which is worn on, and covers, the head. The tribesmen were wearing head-dresses of fur and feathers.
ˌheadˈfirst adverb
with one's head in front or bent forward. He fell headfirst into a pool of water.
ˈheadgear noun
anything that is worn on the head. Hats, caps and helmets are headgear.
ˈheadlamp noun
a headlight.
ˈheadland noun
a point of land which sticks out into the sea.
ˈheadlight noun
a powerful light at or on the front of a car, lorry, train, ship, aeroplane etc. As it was getting dark, the driver switched on his headlights.
ˈheadline noun
the words written in large letters at the top of newspaper articles. I never read a paper in detail – I just glance at the headlines.
ˈheadlines noun plural
a brief statement of the most important items of news, on television or radio. the news headlines.
ˈheadlong adjective, adverb
1. moving forwards or downwards, with one's head in front. a headlong dive into the pool of water; He fell headlong into a pool of water.
2. (done) without thought or delay, often foolishly. a headlong rush; He rushes headlong into disaster.
head louse
a type of louse that infests the human head.
headˈmasterfeminine headˈmistress noun
the person in charge of a school; the principal.
ˌhead-ˈon adverb, adjective
(usually of cars etc) with the front of one car etc hitting the front of another car etc. a head-on collision; The two cars crashed head-on.
ˈheadphones noun plural
(also ˈearphones) a pair of electronic instruments held over a person's ears, by a metal band over the head, which are connected to a radio. a set of headphones.
ˌheadˈquarters noun singular or plural
(often abbreviated to HQ (eitʃˈkjuː) noun) the place from which the chief officers or leaders of an organization (especially an army) direct and control the activities of that organization. During the election, his house was used as the campaign headquarters.
ˈheadrest noun
a sort of small cushion which supports a person's head, eg as fitted to a dentist's chair, a car seat.
ˈheadscarf, ˈheadsquare nouns
a usually square scarf worn by women over or round the head.
ˈheadstone noun
a stone put at a grave, usually with the name of the dead person on it, the date of his birth and death etc.
ˈheadstrong adjective
(of people) difficult to persuade or control; always doing or wanting to do what they themselves want. a headstrong, obstinate child.
ˈheadwind noun
a wind which is blowing towards one.
above someone's head
too difficult (for someone) to understand. His lecture was well above their heads.
go to someone's head
1. (of alcohol) to make someone slightly drunk. Champagne always goes to my head.
2. (of praise, success etc) to make someone arrogant, foolish etc. Don't let success go to your head.
head off
1. to make (a person, animal etc) change direction. One group of the soldiers rode across the valley to head the bandits off.
2. to go in some direction. He headed off towards the river.
head over heels
1. completely. He fell head over heels in love.
2. turning over completely; headfirst. He fell head over heels into a pond.
heads or tails?
used when tossing a coin, eg to decide which of two people does, gets etc something. Heads or tails? Heads you do the dishes, tails I do them.
keep one's head
to remain calm and sensible in a crisis etc.
lose one's head
to become angry or excited, or to act foolishly in a crisis.
make head or tail of
to understand. I can't make head or tail of these instructions.
make headway
to make progress. We're not making much headway with this new scheme.
off one's head
mad. You must be off your head to work for nothing.
References in classic literature ?
The Golden Fortune was curiously situated, perched at the extreme sea-end of a little horse-shoe bay hollowed out between two headlands, the points of which approached each other so closely that the river Sly had but a few yards of rocky channel through which to pour itself into the sea.
The first and second headlands were directly in line with the south-west wind; but once around the second,--and we went perilously near,--we picked up the third headland, still in line with the wind and with the other two.
On the left the low-lying land stretched in a dim haze, rising here and there into a darker blur which marked the higher capes and headlands.
Some of the inhabitants remarked to me that they never viewed one of those bay-like recesses, with the headlands receding on both hands, without being struck with their resemblance to a bold sea-coast.
The vessel glided between the headlands of the port, and the giant resumed his march.
These ridges are chopped off at the mouth of the gorge and form two bold and conspicuous headlands, with Heidelberg nestling between them; from their bases spreads away the vast dim expanse of the Rhine valley, and into this expanse the Neckar goes wandering in shining curves and is presently lost to view.
In Zetland there are several scores of these Burghs, occupying in every case, capes, headlands, islets, and similar places of advantage singularly well chosen.
There were no trees--only bleak headlands, a thundering surf, and strong winds that seemed never to cease from blowing.
In our most trivial walks, we are constantly, though unconsciously, steering like pilots by certain well-known beacons and headlands, and if we go beyond our usual course we still carry in our minds the bearing of some neighboring cape; and not till we are completely lost, or turned round -- for a man needs only to be turned round once with his eyes shut in this world to be lost -- do we appreciate the vastness and strangeness of nature.
Between bold headlands of rock and under a gray cloud-blown sky, a dozen boats, long and lean and dark, beaked like monstrous birds, were landing on a foam-whitened beach of sand.
Your Landfall, be it a peculiarly-shaped mountain, a rocky headland, or a stretch of sand-dunes, you meet at first with a single glance.
They were standing on the bank of the pond, below Orchard Slope, where a little headland fringed with birches ran out from the bank; at its tip was a small wooden platform built out into the water for the convenience of fishermen and duck hunters.