HBM

(redirected from Health Belief Model)
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Related to Health Belief Model: Theory of reasoned action

HBM

(in Britain) abbreviation for
His (or Her) Britannic Majesty

H.B.M.

Her Britannic Majesty; His Britannic Majesty.
References in periodicals archive ?
Key Words: cardiac rehabilitation, adherence, health belief model, self-monitoring
They are also key components of the Health Belief Model, a common approach to promoting healthy behavior that stresses the importance of recognizing the bad personal consequences of specific behaviors in motivating resistance to them (Rosenstock et al.
The health belief model refers generally to the effect of reinforcement and punishment upon acquisition and maintenance of compliance by including benefits and barriers (Wallston, 1992).
Predictors that were investigated included the composite scores for each of the health belief model concepts, demographic variables (sex, age, area code, education, income, ethnicity), and residential mosquito activity level.
Clearly, these women are not acting as the rational health belief model would predict.
According to the Health Belief Model [19], an individual's perception of risk will influence the decision to seek medical care.
Other theoretical explanations, such as the Health Belief Model, are needed to expand our theoretical understanding of collegiate drinking.
The Health Belief Model (HBM) was first developed in the 1950s by a group of social psychologists to explore why individuals would not participate in preventative health services that were offered to assist them with disease detection and prevention (Thalacker, 2011).
The Health Belief Model (HBM) served as the conceptual framework for the study.
Theoretical frameworks such as the Health Belief Model and the Theory of Planned Behaviour (20,21) posit that in order to promote healthy eating in the home, parents need to believe in the benefits of healthy food for their children and that these benefits outweigh any 'risks', 'costs' or barriers associated with providing healthy food, including such factors as financial costs, time costs, lack of convenience and any potential adverse effects such as family conflict, children's pestering or food wastage.
Research in chronic illnesses other than asthma has operationalized the concepts in the Health Belief Model and the Theory of Planned Behavior, including health beliefs, attitude, and behavioral intention, and demonstrated the influence of those concepts' over adherence behaviors with recommended treatment regimens.
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