thermal conductance

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thermal conductance

n.
1. A measure of the ability of an object to allow the flow of heat from its warmer surface through the object to its colder surface, determined as the heat energy transferred per unit of time divided by the temperature difference between the two surfaces, expressed in watts per kelvin. The conductance of an object equals the conductivity of its material times its surface area (cross-section) divided by the distance between the two surfaces (thickness).
2. The reciprocal of thermal resistance, usually measured in units of watts per kelvin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Handbooks provide equations to calculate the heat transfer coefficient for different configurations and flow conditions.
They could be presented in the form of dependency of heat transfer coefficient or heat flux, as presented in figure 4.
The results showed that the selection of optimal combination of BESS technologies has the greatest impact on the final energy performance of the building, because the additional insulation of building constructions, when the heat transfer coefficient of walls is increased by 67%, roof--54%, floor--60% and the heat transfer coefficient of windows is decreased by 49%, gives the reduction of final energy only by 5.
As expected, the temperature differential of 2[degrees]C resulted in very little change in heat transfer coefficient over several hours.
This paper describes a study which was initiated to resolve deficiencies in heat transfer coefficient data for food cooling and freezing processes by forced convection.
The wind and indoor convective heat transfer coefficient was calculated using the relationship obtained from "Solar Engineering of Thermal Processes" (Duffie and Beckman 1980).
The tremendous increase in heat transfer coefficient causes the new system to significantly increase the power dissipation of the 1U compared to other conventionally cooled 1U chassis.
Comparison of the experimental with the numerical cooling curves reveals the weakness of the use of one single heat transfer coefficient to effectively reproduce the solidification rate throughout the casting.
Thus, the refrigerant heat transfer coefficient can easily be calculated using Newton's law of cooling if the refrigerant temperature is known.