Heat-Moon

Heat-Moon

(ˈhitˈmun)
n.
William Least, (William Trogden), born 1939, U.S. writer.
References in periodicals archive ?
It's time to get off the 'road so crooked it could run for the legislature,' as William Least Heat-Moon wrote, although in quite another context.
"Celestial Mechanics: A Tale For A Mid-Winter Night" by William least Heat-Moon is an emotional tale of haunted love in which Silas finds himself locked in a marriage descending toward darkness until the arrival of his sister-in-law and soon thereafter the appearance of a witching neighbor who may or may not be alive.
William Least Heat-Moon; CELESTIAL MECHANICS; Three Rooms Press (Fiction: Literary) 28.00 ISBN: 9781941110560
While the author makes a special effort to highlight the work of travel writers who haven't been extensively studied, he also looks at well-known authors, such as Mark Twain and William Least Heat-Moon. The study avoids government or company-inspired writing, avoids novels (expect Jack Kerouac's On the Road), and avoids nature writing, instead emphasizing travel writing that reveals cultural landscapes.
Heat-Moon's continuous encounters with the citizens are so special, and they allow him to present a true American experience.
On his night stand: "Roads to Quoz: An American Mosey" by William Least Heat-Moon and "Wild Beauty: Photography of the Columbia River Gorge 1867-1957" edited by Terry Toedtemeier and John Laursen
Allister focuses his study on six works: Sue Hubbell's A Country Year, Terry Tempest Williams's Refuge, Bill Barich's Laughing in the Hills, William Least Heat-Moon's Blue Highways, Peter Matthiessen's The Snow Leopard, and Gretel Ehrlich's The Solace of Open Spaces.
Imagine Jack Kerouac, Least Heat-Moon, or Pirsig with a TripTik and directions from an editor.
Also from PIMLICO are reissues of two American travel books by William Least Heat-Moon, Blue Highways: A Journey into America ([pound]12.50.
William Least Heat-moon, who became intimately acquainted with these very same prairie hills during the writing of PrairyErth, wrote of the process: "It's not that I had to learn to think flat - the prairies rarely are - but I had to begin thinking open and lean, seeing without set points of obvious focus, noticing first the horizon and then drawing my vision back toward the middle distance where so little appears to exist.
Author William Least Heat-Moon has written two books, both bestsellers.
The September Atlantic also has an excerpt from William Least Heat-Moon's forthcoming PrairyEarth, in which the author of Blue Highways uncovers more about that section of unknown America that lies between the two coasts.